Kaia Gerber: Mom Cindy Crawford ‘told me not to touch my brows’

I’m going to take a moment and just be jealous of Kaia Gerber. She is gorgeous, has legs for days, is a successful model – currently the face of Marc Jacobs Beauty – and her Mom is supermodel Cindy Crawford. Obviously, the apple hasn’t fallen far from the tree here.

At an event celebrating the 10-year anniversary of Marc Jacobs’ popular scent, Daisy, Kaia shared her beauty secrets (that weren’t “be the daughter of Cindy Crawford”) with PEOPLE Magazine. When asked about the invaluable advice her Mom gave her, Kaia said, “She told me not to touch my brows,” adding, “There was a time when I really wanted to do stuff to them, but she doesn’t touch hers and she still has really good brows, so I just learned from her not to touch them and I’m glad I didn’t.”

She went on to share that, “I could never sleep in makeup—that’s my big thing. I wash my face and moisturize it every night. I also use masks.” Oh…so THAT’S what I’m doing wrong. In an interview with POPSUGAR, she shared even more skincare tips, including, “My mom has taught me not to overdry my skin. A lot of people make the mistake of doing too much to it. The natural oils are really important. She’s taught me about doing enough to it, but not overdoing it.”

Despite being an in-demand model, Kaia is like any other girl, binge-watching shows like Criminal Minds and 13 Reasons Why and listening to Harry Styles. She’s also active on social media. While she says she tries “not to be too serious” with her posts, she admits maintaining a positive presence is tough sometimes.

It’s a lot of pressure — thinking how many girls might look up to me — and I really just want to be the role model that they need. I definitely think before I post. But at the same time, social media is the closest a lot of people get to my personality. So I want to show people who I actually am. I’m a regular person. I’m not having this glamorous, crazy life. I think it’s cool to show people that. They can see that I’m going to school and have normal friends.

[From POPSUGAR]

When asked to offer advice to her fellow teens, Kaia channeled RuPaul, saying, “You have to love yourself if you expect other people to be able to love you.”

Kaia has not been on my radar before, but she really seems like she’s got a good head on her shoulders. And, of course, she is beautiful. My Mom was a runway model but her genes eluded me. Instead of being 5’9”, I got my Dad’s short legs. At least I know now to leave my brows alone and wash my face before I pass out at 9pm. Yes, I lead quite the glamorous life.

Photos: Getty Images, WENN.com, Pacific Coast News

 

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78 Responses to “Kaia Gerber: Mom Cindy Crawford ‘told me not to touch my brows’”

  1. Tan says:

    She is beautiful
    But isn’t she also a nepotism model

    Would she be the face of Marc Jacobs if it wasn’t for her mother?

    She is nothing special

  2. minx says:

    Sorry, I think she is a very average girl who is lucky to have the parents she does.

    • Snappyfish says:

      Exactly. I saw an short mad lib interview in Allure she did. Under the quote “everyone says I look like my mom but I think I look like me…

      Please. She is a model because of nepotism. Her mother was vapid (going to northwestern for a semester doesn’t a chemical engineer make) & clearly this apple is wedged right up against the tree.

      • Jegede says:

        Kaia looks like her father.
        She has Rande’s close set eyes and heart shaped face.

        She’s alright, but it’s the boy who stands out and looks like Cindy.

        I’m legit surprised that Crawford – ‘the down- home supermodel from the Midwest’ – is such a crazed showbiz mama a la Kris Jenner. Would never have guessed
        Cindy is pushing her hard but the fact is if you wiped the make up off Kaia (make up that she ALWAYS has on) and scraped her hair back, there will be a hundred girl in Venice Beach who are better looking.

      • pf says:

        I agree, Jegede. I’ve never understood all these people who say Kaia is her mother’s clone. Are they blind? She looks just like her dad…like you said with the close set eyes. If their son didn’t have blonde hair, it would be more obvious how much he looks like Cindy. He even has a mole.

      • teacakes says:

        @Jegede @pf – if Kaia looks like anyone, it’s Rachel Bilson with less charisma.

        She’s a pretty girl but we all know she wouldn’t be anywhere near high fashion if it wasn’t for her mother.

  3. Liberty says:

    Did mom tell her to attend college, too? Just wondering. I was at a party two weeks ago and someone in the crowd started a game of (1) Name the celebrities who have a doctor or lawyer or scientist or teacher/ professor as a child; (2) name the current celebs most likely to have kids who go into any of these professions someday.

    • Canadian Becks says:

      Strange as it sounds, but maybe Jessica Biel’s son? Very recently, she’s been quoted as saying she doesn’t want him going into music but rather into a profession.

    • Laura says:

      Is there a problem with following your parents footsteps? Most lawyers and doctors I know are the sons or daughters of lawyers and doctors. So they clearly benefit from nepotism too, which I’m assuming your point is? Some families all have the same sort of careers. I don’t see why it’s an issue.

      • Liberty says:

        The game point was: ample means to afford a top education, and how many use this? Fine to be whatever they want, just more of a question — do they consider their fortune of opportunity.

      • Tan says:

        I think the poster’s point is, most of them do not bother to get much education.

        And frankly celebs have all sorts of connection so even if their kids want to be a doctor or lawyer and avail of nepotism they can. That way we all avail of nepotism to whatevee degree there is possible mostly.

        But most of these children end up beinh role models of a lot of people and they don’t have any credential other than being children of so and so. It results in making bad choices and encouraging people making bad choices.

        If they indeed get some education ( and improve critical thinking) and talk about it aside from fashion and music and this and that, maybe it would also serve to inspire the young people who tend to idolize them and try to be like them.

      • Everly says:

        College education is not for everyone. Most of my friends working class or middle class have the same occupation as their parents.

      • teacakes says:

        @Laura – you do realise doctors and lawyers have to get actual professional qualifications, right? As in, exams and studies that you have to clear no matter who your parents are, and which your parents don’t assess.

        But sure, a lawyer’s kid going to law school and clearing the bar is the same as showbiz mommy Cindy trying to prove her genes are superior by getting her friends to give jobs to her daughter. Sure.

      • Hana says:

        Teacakes, what about the children of actors who go to drama school? They have to take exams etc too. They have to study. The lawyers children who go to law school and pass the bar have advantages of lawyer parents. They work hard but clearly they also have an advantage. My best friend is a teacher, her parents are teachers also. Of course she had to study and qualify but she had massive advantages due to her parents. Why have you also singled out the careers of the middle class? Why not ask why celebrities children are not becoming plumbers, builders, speech therapist etc? Why do you value lawyers etc more highly?

      • teacakes says:

        @Hana – not sure why you’re so terribly defensive over actor nepotism, but here’s a very basic distinction between lawyers/doctors/specialised professions vs actors, since you seem to be unaware of it – drama school is a nice add-on but not compulsory for actors, and most working actors don’t do it.

        Meanwhile, doctors and lawyers and teachers like your friend, cannot call themselves doctors/lawyers/teachers without formal qualifications. Your teacher friend may find it helpful to have teacher parents but she can’t work as a teacher if she had just her parents and no degree.

        Meanwhile any nepotism baby in Hollywood who actually has just connected parents and no talent, can pretty easily finagle their way into major jobs – ex. Kaya here, and get majorly paid for it too.

      • holly hobby says:

        Look no further for the failure of nepotism than Tori Spelling. Yes you get a leg up but once your folks are gone, will the calls keep coming in? It didn’t for Tori.

      • AMA1977 says:

        I think it’s a matter of wanting things to be better for your children than they were for you. Even very successful actors and models have almost universally been subjected to negative, distressing, and possibly dangerous circumstances, and I for one would want my kids to stay far away from that. Also, a career as a performer comes with tons of rejection and no guarantee of success, even if one is extremely talented. There is an element of luck that is completely unpredictable. On the flip side of the coin, anyone who excels in school and passes the credentialing exams (and the background check!) can enter the legal or medical fields.

        To address the second part of your statement, I’m married to an attorney who was the first person in his family to graduate from college, so definitely not from a family of lawyers. We’ve also got a higher-than-usual proportion of lawyer friends because of that, and virtually none of them are the children of lawyers. Of course it happens, but it’s not anywhere near as universal as it seems to be for celebrity offspring to decide they have a passion for acting, modeling, etc. I will also say that if either of our kids want to become an attorney, we would both be thrilled and supportive, but there is no expectation that they must or should.

    • Nicole8672 says:

      I agree that many celebs don’t seem to have children that are doctors, lawyers, researchers etc and many seem to follow in their parents footsteps. However I am not sure that is entirely fair.
      Many of us average folk can only dream that their children will have the smarts to go to medical school or law school.
      As an aside although beautiful, Kaia, IMHO does not have the same it factor as her mother, however Presley sure does.

      • Hana says:

        Most doctors, lawyers and researchers are the sons or daughters of doctors, lawyers and researchers. Not everyone wants to be a doctor, lawyer or researcher.

      • Helen says:

        I’m a doctor and most of the people I studied medicine with came from a families with a medical background. Nearly everyone had atleast one doctor for a parent. My best friend is a plumber. Her mum and dad are plumbers. Sure she had to work hard at college but still had the benefit of parents with the same career. Trades have a higher portion of nepotism than middle class careers but apparently this is not allowed to be mentioned.

      • WeAreAllMadeofStars says:

        Oh, God. Did it ever occur to you all that just because something is allegedly true in England, an incredibly classist society, that it doesn’t necessarily hold for every other country on earth? And yes, I referenced all other countries, not just the US. Who cares if the children of are more likely to become models and the children of lawyers are more likely to become lawyers? I don’t give a quack about either profession, and if a child inherits their parents’ interests and skill set, what’s so terrible about that? Being a lawyer is no more noble a profession than being a casting agent. They have nothing to prove to you.

    • Ayra. says:

      That sounds like a fun game lol. I think that maybe some of the Jolie-Pitt kids might go out of Hollywood’s scene.

    • echophoebe says:

      Rory Taylor, Roger Taylor’s (of Queen) daughter is a doctor. Also Marlon Brando’s grandson Tuki studied medicine and probably already is a doctor. There are probably more examples but those doctor celeb kids aren’t usually promoting themselves on the red carpets so we wouldn’t know about them.

  4. Marion C. says:

    She’s pretty and has great genetics but IMO her brother has the more unique look/it factor to model.

  5. Jess says:

    All very sound advice, I have eyebrows like Brooke Shields and at 15 I tweezed them into a thin line because people made fun of me, I thought my dad was going to faint lol, he was so sad. I don’t think they ever grew back as thick as they used to be!! I also can’t sleep in make up, no matter how exhausted or drunk I may be I find a way to wash my face. I think one important thing for young women to do is drink enough water, I wish I had known that earlier I think my skin would look better.

    Kaia is a beauty, she hit the genetic lottery. Hopefully she’ll stay relatively sweet as she gets older and stay out of trouble.

  6. D says:

    “You have to love yourself if you expect other people to be able to love you.” I disagree with this so much, people should be able to love you even if you don’t love yourself, because that’s when you need it the most. I think that saying something like that just make things worse like -”I hate myself and that means no one will ever love me”, you know what I mean? (English is not my first language so maybe I’m explaining myself poorly,sorry)

    • Erinn says:

      I find she’s just repeating things that everyone else already talks about. Yes, taking care of your skin is good. Yes, loving yourself is important. Nothing she’s saying is groundbreaking at all. But I agree with you – the last thing someone who’s in a rough spot wants to hear is that they’re also unlovable.

    • Dollypaws says:

      Totally agree with you. I fucking hate this trite nonsense of having to love yourself etc . I don’t ‘love’ myself – but I’ve learned to tolerate myself and laugh at myself. That’ll have to suffice for now. I’m actually disappointed at how much Cindy has pimped her daughter at such a young age.

  7. Nicole says:

    She seems fine. Nothing controversial. And it seems like she actually HAS a personality unlike Bella or Kendall that are incredibly boring.

  8. Cherbear says:

    Cindy got into Northwestern Univeristy for engineering or something – she didn’t finish, but she is a very intelligent woman, and for her daughter’s sake, I hope she got that from her mom even more than the beauty. One fades, the other is more reliable.

  9. Nancy says:

    I think it would be so draining to be Cindy’s daughter, hearing beauty tips all the time. I hope she does what she wants to do, not what her mother wants her to do and doesn’t become a mini Cindy just to please her. She’s right, there’s a lot of pressure, but I have a feeling the pressure starts at home.

    • Esmom says:

      I found the “beauty tips from mom” angle to be exhausting and sort of depressing, too. But maybe it’s not really true…people say anything for PR and maybe she thought people would want to hear about a girl getting beauty tips from her supermodel mom.

  10. Feedmechips says:

    I can’t even hate on the nepotism here. She is really ridiculously good looking.

  11. Lauren says:

    You need to add the nepotism tag.

  12. teehee says:

    And she looks great. Lets be petty towards men and start caring about their heinously ungroomed eyebrows and nose hairs instead.

  13. Clare says:

    I wish someone had told me to use moisturizer as a teenager.
    I also wish my mum had known what type of hair conditioner would help control my hair (bi-racial kid problems).

    But, my mum did let me turn up to family weddings/christmases etc dressed as a smurf/pumpkin/martian…so it wasn’t all bad :)

    • Jay says:

      Your mom sounds way better than Cindy Crawford.

    • littlemissnaughty says:

      LMAO That is awesome.

      Yeah, my mom wasn’t much help either. We just don’t have the same skin or hair (she’s never used anything but soap and a cheap moisturizer) and I was left alone to fend for my oily pimply skin. The results were … not stellar.

      But hey, she taught me the two most important things in life. If you want something or have something to say, open your mouth because nobody will just hand you anything. And nothing is free, you need to work for it. I figured out the skincare for myself. :-)

  14. Shannon says:

    Wow. Harsh comments geared toward a kid. She’s lovely and seems nice.

  15. Delta Juliet says:

    I don’t see how anyone can say she isn’t pretty? She’s clearly very attractive, but also sort of generic. She reminds me of a slew of random brunette actresses….Rachel Bilson maybe?

  16. Katherine says:

    She looks like Rachel Bilson to me!

  17. Svea says:

    The nepotism models are all boring. I really miss the days of the super models. They all had something extra extra.

  18. Blaire Carter says:

    Her dress (the sequined one) has a vacuum on it. It’s like $4000. Oh the irony…

  19. CatherinetheGoodEnough says:

    Cindy Crawford also went on record as not vaccinating her kids. So I’m not putting any stock in her “advice,” no matter how pretty her kids turn out to be.

  20. KBeth says:

    I recognize the nepotism going on here but I do think she is pretty enough to have a moderately successful modeling career on her on.
    Sadly the era of the “supermodel” is over, nothing special about todays lot….

  21. Jackrabbit says:

    In the family photo (with the burgundy dress) she looks exactly like Cindy in her early days of modelling. As someone mentioned upthread, she’s still very young (I don’t think Cindy had been officially “discovered” at her age but was still doing local mall fashion shows and flyer photo shoots) and if she, at 15, would be oozing the smouldering sexiness Cindy was known for in the 80′s/90′s that would be a problem too (and another reason to rip apart Cindy’s parenting) the poor girl (and her mother) can’t win. *change of topic* (sorta😉) I think what makes the new “instamodels” so bland is they are clones of one another – same hair, same impossibly thin physiques, they dress the same, blah, blah, blah….but in the 80′s/90′s there was so much diversity in looks, body types and styles…..even “The Trinity” didn’t morph into one another. A sad thought, by today’s standards in the fashion industry, Cindy would probably be considered a “plus sized model”.

  22. blonde555 says:

    Pretty girl, nothing special. I’m sure she hangs out with the Smith’s after a hard days work.

  23. Littlestar says:

    I’m fairly certain that she’s a few years younger than the two Jenner girls but she interviews so much better.

  24. Magnoliarose says:

    She’s very pretty but it doesn’t sit so well with me that Cindy puts her daughter in the public eye to be criticized on her appearance at such a young age. Because she is trying to model the only thing she has is her looks. It isn’t like the daughter of a singer who can also sing.
    There is something very sweet and appealing about her. I think if she can act, it would be a better choice. She isn’t without charisma.
    The PR push is a little heavy handed right now.

  25. Tinkerbell says:

    Cindy’s my favorite celebrity, so I’ve followed her for years. She was her high school valedictorian and thought twice before quitting college. She’s bright and level-headed. Her daughter is a straight A student and seems like a nice kid. I would assume Cindy wants Kaia to experience college and is letting her have some fun right now.

  26. Shijel says:

    This comment section is harsh. She’s a 15-year-old.

  27. perplexed says:

    I think she’d be a model even if she weren’t Crawford’s daughter. Whether she’d reach the heights her mother did, I have no idea though. But she’d probably make it in some realm of modelling — she’s not ugly and it looks like she had a growth spurt.

    She’s only 15 which is probably why she isn’t Amazonian like her mother was at 22. But, who knows, at 22, she just might be like that.

    The son is quite handsome, I have to admit. Now that is some genetic lottery right there. Hopefully, he keeps his looks and doesn’t turn weird-looking like men who peak early and over-modelize and over-stylize tend to become. He’s still so young that it’s a little odd to me that he could be handsome at his age. And men who know they look good usually do weird stuff to their hair and faces that by the time they reach 25, you’re like “What happened?”

  28. Molly says:

    She is lovely, but I’m sorry-that wine colored outfit is too old for her.

  29. Kelly says:

    I think they are all a lovely family. Do you any of you know….if you start shaving your legs, does it grow back more?

  30. Nancy says:

    Jealousy is a timeless excuse usually used by men that drives me nuts. Not agreeing or praising an attractive woman does not equate envy to me. I have never read a post praising Kendall Jenner’s looks, because her family isn’t well loved, but don’t dare say something negative about Cindy. I guess being pretty opens door because our country is obsessed with aesthetics……..beauty is skin deep. The soul radiates the beauty, no matter how blessed you are in the gene pool. Like I said up thread, I hope Kaia chooses her own path and doesn’t try to emulate Cindy. It’s always best to be true to yourself.

  31. Shannon says:

    Agreed. People who don’t have confidence in themselves will always try to tear down others and it’s sad.

  32. Shijel says:

    Nancy, she’s not a woman though. She’s a 15-year-old. And I grew into my looks, but at 15 I was one hideous teenager. I find people ragging on her (very good) looks cruel, especially since she’s pushed by her parents into modelling, I don’t trust a 10-year-old (I think she was 10 when her name first cropped up with her mom) to make an informed decision about wanting to become a model. And therefore I am unhappy with people taking swipes at her more than I’d be angry with people taking swipes at a grown woman who made the decision themselves to go into modelling.

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