Page Six: Anna Wintour might be pushed out of American Vogue, Conde Nast


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Anna Wintour is pretty much an institution at American Vogue. In fact, Wintour has accrued so much power at Conde Nast over the years that she was given the somewhat gaudy title of “Artistic Director for Conde Nast” in 2013. Meaning, she can make or break any Conde Nast publication, any editor, any editorial. When Graydon Carter left Vanity Fair several months ago, many believed that it was the end of the era, but many also thought “huh, I bet Wintour gets even more power at Conde Nast after Graydon’s exit.” Well, Page Six’s sources think the opposite is true: sources say that after Graydon’s exit, Anna Wintour might be pushed out too. Or she might leave of her own accord.

It is almost beyond the fashion world’s wildest imagination, but the chatter coming out of Condé Nast and the publishing industry has reached a deafening crescendo — Anna Wintour could be on her way out of Condé and Vogue as artistic director. A host of stunned sources have told Page Six that Wintour — the grand high priestess of both the fashion and publishing industries since she became editor in chief of Vogue in 1988 — is to exit her all-powerful role at the publishing house this summer after the July wedding of her daughter, Bee Schaffer, to Francesco Carrozzini, the son of former Italian Vogue Editor Franca Sozzani.

The move would also allow Wintour, 68 — who has for three decades been fashion’s ultimate power broker — to step aside on a high after closing Vogue’s all-important September issue. But Condé Nast strongly denies Wintour is going. A Condé corporate spokesperson told Page Six on Monday, “We emphatically deny these rumors,” but declined to comment more specifically on Wintour’s plans.

However, we’re told Vogue UK’s editor, Edward Enninful, is the likely replacement as the editor of US Vogue. It’s unclear who — if anyone — might replace Wintour as the artistic director of Condé Nast, the title she ascended to in 2013, giving her oversight over all Condé magazine titles. Longtime Condé chairman Si Newhouse, who died in October 2017, was Wintour’s biggest cheerleader. But there are rumors that his presumed successor Jonathan Newhouse — who is chairman of Condé Nast International and has been in London running the company’s international arm — is coming back to New York. Jonathan, “doesn’t like [the amount of power] Anna has” and favors Enninful, one source tells us.

Reps for Condé Nast declined to comment on Jonathan Newhouse, and pointed us to reps for their international arm, which didn’t immediately comment.

[From Page Six]

I’m gonna stop Page Six right there. Edward Enninful is doing good work as the new editor of British Vogue, and many believe that he was chosen BY Anna Wintour for that job. Enninful JUST GOT THERE. Yes, Enninful has been working in fashion media for years and he’s got lots of experience, but let him get his feet wet at British Vogue before trying to hand him the keys to Wintour’s office. And while Jonathan Newhouse might not like the amount of power Wintour has, that’s tough sh-t. Because Wintour has barricaded herself into Conde Nast and she won’t be leaving until she wants to. That’s the bigger question: after accruing so much power, what’s left for her? Does she just want to stay static in her current position? That, I have no idea. But keep the faith: if they try to push her out, she will not go quietly.

Oh, and Page Six says this too: “There’s even buzz that Wintour’s exit interview has already been arranged and granted to the New York Times – the newspaper that also smoothed over the edges of Carter and Cindi Lieve’s departures, insisting that both had left entirely of their own volition.” No. That won’t happen. Plus, Graydon really did leave because he decided he was done, right? Hmmm…

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27 Responses to “Page Six: Anna Wintour might be pushed out of American Vogue, Conde Nast”

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  1. Molly says:

    I never liked her. Fashion should be creative and free, people like her spoil it all.

  2. Kitty says:

    Thank you!!!!! She needs to go.

    • Natalie S says:

      She’s out of ideas. It’s more that she’s made herself entrenched than about what she contributes. I hope they finally do replace her.

      Once she made Vogue all Kendal Jenner all the time, you could see that she was chasing what she hoped should be in the magazine rather than knowing what was worth being in Vogue.

  3. Other Renee says:

    I’ve always wondered how the supposed arbiter of all things fashion consistently chooses such ugly clothes to wear. And don’t get me started on her hair!

  4. Betsy says:

    I have not liked the direction:Vogue has taken under Wintour. I wouldn’t mind someone new. She could even be on the older end, but I am done with the celebrity worship, the Kardashians getting coverage, the thin thin thin thin women….

  5. Digital Unicorn says:

    Wouldn’t be surprised. Vogue as an international brand needs new and younger ‘blood’. It’s still the fashion bible but it needs to keep evolving.

    She could easily start up her own mag or even write trashy novels like Nicholas Coleridge (UK Conde Nast CEO) does about the industry.

  6. Neelyo says:

    Oh F her. All for Hillary until after the election she was one of the first people to pay tribute at Trump Tower. Lost any respect I had for her after that.

    • Rhys says:

      I don’t remember her paying a “tribute to Trump tower”, when did she do that? I recall her saying that all First Ladies have been featured on the cover or Vogue so there’s no reason why Melani Trump wouldn’t be. As it is Melania hasn’t been on the cover of V as First Lady.

  7. aenflex says:

    Something so pretentious and contrived about her whole look, to me. Her posture, sad granny being saddled wth the heaviest weight in the whole wild world, a true martyr for the fashion universe. I can’t beleive fashion has been based on tastes of this one woman for so long. Term limits, people, even for well performers. Her too-cool-for-school look with always wearing those shades, it’s ridiculous. I just don’t see it, but that’s just me…

  8. Rhys says:

    Her glorification of bullying culture at work and in fashion is nauseating – no one will miss her.
    Someone new, with a fresh outlook and ideas would be perfect. Vogue has become so boring to me. I subscribed because my cc offered free subscription and it goes directly into the bin every month.

    • Deering24 says:

      Thank you. That glorification is the major reason I hate THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA movie. Even though the Wintour character is the villian, we’re supposed to find her employee bullying and mean-girl workplace culture cool because it’s all so glamourous and all—and Miranda is so great at her job. Fuck that noise—no amount of expertise justifies degrading your workers.

  9. Jussie says:

    She should have been kicked out a long time ago. US Vogue has always been painfully, painfully dull under her, and she’s lost a new generation of readers to the far superior French, Italian and Japanese editions. Now the British edition is heading in that direction, and doing far better for it.

  10. Remy Red says:

    British Vogue was getting more and more uninspiring under Alexandra Schulman, but Edward Enninful hasn’t been the blast of fresh air I was hoping for. Yes, his determination to feature more models who aren’t white is A Good Thing, but his debut edition was otherwise completely underwhelming and I semi-resolved not to bother looking at British Vogue anymore. Therefore I’d like him become the editor of American Vogue as soon as possible so that, fingers crossed, we might get a more interesting replacement over here.

  11. Boodiba says:

    People still read fashion magazines?

  12. The Original G says:

    Let this be a lesson. Don’t find yourself 68 without a transition plan in your life.

  13. Amelie says:

    I keep hearing great things about Teen Vogue–does she have power over that publication too? I’m assuming so. Why can’t US Vogue be more like Teen Vogue (the adult version)?

    If she is leaving, 30 years is a good solid number to put in. I can’t see her leave willingly, as she is the “high grand priestess” (that sentence made me LOL) of high fashion here in the US and she is a workaholic. But it is time to revamp Vogue. Most of the articles made me roll my eyes at how they fawn over the subject they are reporting about.

  14. Peter says:

    I think wearing sunglasses in front of the queen was a breaking point. Her halo slipped then all too clearly.

  15. PunkyMomma says:

    I canceled my subscription to Vogue the day she put Kim and Kayne on the cover and justified using the Kardashians/Wests by spouting some culture of current celebrity as her excuse for choosing fame over fashion. No, Anna, Vogue is not People.

    Bye, Felicia.

  16. Lyla says:

    If La Wintour leaves, I wonder who would replace her? Years ago, I remember there being tall about Eva Chen being groomed to replace Anna, but I think Eva is happy at Instagram.

  17. sza says:

    I blame her for the advancement of the Kardashians. Goodbye,arbiter of bad taste.

  18. Deeanna says:

    68??? Sheesh!

    Time to get some youth into the fashion world! And back into the presidency too.

    (And I am older than both of them.)