Tina Fey regrets what she said about ‘staying home’ during neo-Nazi marches

Meet the 2018 Tony Award Nominees Press Junket

Last August, neo-Nazis marched with Tiki torches in Charlottesville, and then the next day, counterprotesters tried to remind people that neo-Nazis are trash. The neo-Nazis ended up violently attacking many of the counter-protesters, and one young woman was killed. It was awful and it happened in Trump’s America, but Donald Trump wanted us to know that those neo-Nazis were “very fine people.” Anyway, as that was happening, Tina Fey returned to Saturday Night Live’s summer session to do a bit about Charlottesville on Weekend Update.

I said at the time that I hoped Tina was speaking to her main demographic: white women who love her. The same white women who voted for Donald Trump – he got about 60% of the white-woman demographic, and it felt like Tina was trying to speak to those women in particular, and give them a f–king wake-up call that this is what they voted for: neo-Nazis marching in the streets. But Tina was criticized for making the argument that we shouldn’t show up and counter-protest when we see neo-Nazis marching down the street. She was criticized by African-American activists in particular, and they used the skit as a moment to educate and inform white allies that no, they can’t be complacent and they cannot sit this one out.

Now, in a new interview with David Letterman, Tina talks about how she regrets the way she wrote that. Letterman started by praising the skit, and this is what she said:

“Every time I’ve ever done some kind of those update things, I always kind of step in manure. The implication was that I was telling people to give up and not be active, and not fight. That was not my intention, obviously…The idea was … if you feed these kinds of trolls — if you don’t, if you take the air out of it, they disappear faster. And … I didn’t want any more people to get hurt. If I could put one sentence back digitally, I’d say to people: Fight them in every way, except the way that they want.”

[From The Washington Post]

Tina makes a point of not apologizing for the skit – she says she doesn’t want to apologize for or explain any of her comedy – but that she wishes she could have a do-over so she could make her argument a bit clearer. I understood both sides of it – I understood why people criticized her for complacency, but I also understood the argument of “just let dumb racists be dumb into the void of nothingness.”

Tina also called out Letterman to his face for the lack of female writers on The Late Show with David Letterman. He tried to play it like he never believed any women would have wanted to work on the show but Tina was like “we did want to” but honestly, she sort of gave him a pass for that.

2018 Tribeca Film Festival "Love, Gilda" Premiere

Photos courtesy of WENN.

Related stories

You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.

61 Responses to “Tina Fey regrets what she said about ‘staying home’ during neo-Nazi marches”

Comments are Closed

We close comments on older posts to fight comment spam.

  1. LittleWing says:

    Nope. Look, shunning or ignoring may work with religious congregations, but it’s a big fail when it comes to America’s emerging fascism.

    • NameChange says:

      I saw the skit and saw it as a “let them come out with their tiki torches and be met with crickets” statement. It’s a “if a tree falls in the forest and no one hears it” moment. Which I can get. It’s like we’re fanning the flames of their movement with our outrage. Instead, we need counter-movements (voter registrations, free classes on implicit bias, etc.), without linking it to their marches. Not sure if I’m making myself clear, but I could see the merit of not responding to them directly (not just not going out and counter-marching, but also a tv blackout so they get no free publicity).

      • DawnB says:

        A permit was granted for the parade. If they were left alone to wallow in their own self pity, the two state troopers who died in the helicopter crash would still be alive. To argue and join the lunacy isn’t necessary – the counter protesters caused the problem by confronting them.

    • imqrious2 says:

      Nope. Nope. Nope. We cannot remain silent in the face of this Fascism.

      As Jews, we learned: NEVER FORGET… because it can happen again. And while it never “went away”, we are now seeing the rise of Neo-Nazis who feel they have a leader who gives them the power to rise out from under their swampy rocks.

      Martin Niemöller is perhaps best remembered for the quotation:

      First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out—
      Because I was not a Socialist.

      Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out—
      Because I was not a Trade Unionist.

      Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—
      Because I was not a Jew.

      Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.

      We CANNOT let them go unchecked!

      • Carrie1 says:

        I was going to say… thanks for speaking out imqrious2.

        I’m not Jewish but there is a tone growing worldwide which is frankly scaring me tothe point I think about and read more on how Hitler rose to power in effort to check how to stop this repeating.

        No joke, there is something growing. It’s deeply troubling. This is no time for passivity.

  2. Aang says:

    As a biracial woman I never really understood the privilege of white women until very recently. I just always assumed white women would identify with the marginalized in every instance. I was once very poor, am biracial and a woman. I see everything through the eyes of an outsider. I don’t get how removing one or two of those three things makes white women feel like they have a stake in upholding institutions that oppress them. I just don’t get it. If I was suspicious of white women before, I’m super sensitive to their cluelessness now.

    • Betsy says:

      I’ll cop to my cluelessness, though it’s not for lack of trying or for wanting to be clueless. I voted for Hillary and remain appalled that so many white women voted for Orange Toilet. I, too, do not understand why so many women support the white male patriarchy. When I talk to my one friend who did vote for the Toilet – and she now “no longer likes to talk because I get so passionate” (I don’t audibly, but perhaps she can see the fury in my eyes) – she supports feminism. She is a feminist. She mocks her husband’s traditional religion. But she stews in his constant Fox watching. She doesn’t connect this point to that one and her continued selfishness and her looking away makes me rage internally.

      • Mumzy says:

        @laura-j I am an almost 50-year old woman who lives in the Southern U.S. I know a lot of the deal when it comes to racism, but I also know there’s much I don’t know. My long-time best friend is a woman of color and while she has never called me out, her perspective and that of her family has definitely shaped my outlook. My brother in law is Native American and that side of my family faces racism in a whole different, but crushingly harsh way. I value the life perspectives of anyone who walks in shoes I will never wear….yeah they do educate me, but by sharing their lives with me…not by thinking for me by serving me up a nice and easy education.

        My comment to equalitygadfly was to ask her to please not give up calling out her friends if they say something clueless. When I’m clueless I want my friends to call me out. I’d be heartbroken if my best friend tossed me because I said something in ignorance that was insulting to her.

    • Merritt says:

      Agreed. I’m a biracial woman and have been appalled by the white privilege I’ve watched white women engage in, particularly those who claim to be liberal. I just had some friendships end because I was disgusted by their response to my feelings regarding the recent racist incidents at Starbucks and L.A Fitnes, and not feeling comfortable in public spaces. The things they said were just jaw dropping out of touch. FYI, “we will have to agree to disagree” is not an appropriate response when the topic is racism.

      • equalitygadfly says:

        I, too, had to offload some white female friends recently for being completely clueless about a similar situation. They also said the dumbest shit, right to my face, without realizing it.

        Honestly, I have yet to meet a white woman, in real life, who actually understands racism, casual racism, and implicit bias racism. Never. Not one. It’s tough, because I live in a rural area and have yet to even bump into another woman of color in my age group.

        But I’m so exhausted from dealing with it, that I’d just rather be friendless than have to endure it.

      • DP says:

        I am white and I’m sure I do not understand racism, casual racism or implicit bias racism fully.
        I am more aware of it in recent years and absolutely against it when I recognize it. That’s the catch though right? Being able to recognize it is not always easy if your not the one experiencing it. I’m trying to listen more. I’m trying to learn. I’m trying to teach my kids about it.
        I’m sorry you feel frustrated and lonely. Everyone feels that way sometimes, but it must be even harder to deal with if you feel like you don’t have people around you who can truly relate to your journey. Or that you are surrounded by people who are implicitly biased against you. I can relate on the level of being a woman and the sexism we experience through out our lives, but I know it’s not the same.
        I think it’s healthy to distance yourself from people who dismiss your point of view or your reality. I do hope you can try to stay open to friends that understand they don’t get it, but are willing to learn. Friends should validate your feelings and not dismiss them, even if they can’t relate completely.

      • equalitygadfly says:

        Thanks DP. The problem I’ve had is that when I try to “teach” (that sounds self-righteous, but my brain is mush today and I can’t think of a better replacement), or let them know “Hey, that wasn’t cool because…..” I am greeted with either the silent treatment, or “white fragility” that devolves into “You’re being mean! You’re belittling me!” Or, my favorite: “Say it nicer!” I’m not saying it meanly! It’s just that since they’re not used to these types of conversations, it sounds hostile. It’s a no-win. And I am also getting tired of having to respect other people’s feelings, when they don’t feel the need to return the favor.

        Ugh. I’m just exhausted. I have my sister-friends, but we’re scattered all over the world. Thank god for skype and facetime.

      • Mumzy says:

        @equalitygadfly. I’m a white woman who grew up in relative poverty and am now considered “wealthy” by American standards. I was raised by a fundamentalist “Christian” yet racist, sexist, xenophobic mother. You could easily make assumptions about me at first glance: I have a kid at a northeastern Ivy. I have two others at New England prep schools. But I want to beg you to NOT give up on anyone when it comes to sharing your perspective!! I hate the environment we live in today. Don’t stop telling the truth because people’s ignorance pisses you off!! Ignorance is just that —-it’s not knowing because you haven’t been educated.

        I don’t want to be surrounded by people just like me…I know what I think already. Because you are different and have different experiences I NEED to hear what *you* have to say. If I don’t hear your perspective, I will be ignorant about it. I NEED you to call me out when I say *anything* that offends you and I want you to tell me why…not turn your back because I piss you off by not knowing better. It hurts me when I hurt anyone by my ignorance. I care when I’m wrong — I don’t want to be dismissed! I want to be enlightened and the only way for that to happen is for someone to care enough to tell me what I’ve done that is not fully baked. Tell me truth. I need to hear it and I want to hear it. But do it with love….even if angry love. We can lift each other up, but not by walking way.

      • equalitygadfly says:

        Hi Mumzy. While I understand what you’re trying to get at, no, I won’t do it anymore. For decades I’ve tried to point stuff out. Kindly. Bluntly. Angrily. Every which way. And every time. Every. Single. Time. I am met with “white fragility responses.”

        I’m exhausted. I need to put my mental health first, now. It is not my job to educate people who’ve had decades to figure this out, but have ignored us for decades.

        Thank goodness for the Internet; because now anyone who really wants to know where they’re going wrong can just hop online and start “googling.” But I’m tapping out. I tried. I’ve been trying since I was 10 — as one of a handful of black kids in a white neighborhood. I’m in my 40s now, and I am spent.

        And please know: I think it’s great that you’re trying your best when it comes to this topic. Keep at it! Mean that.

        https://goodmenproject.com/featured-content/white-fragility-why-its-so-hard-to-talk-to-white-people-about-racism-twlm/

      • equalitygadfly says:

        I just wanted to add, I don’t think white people understand the psychological stress of racism and implicit bias racism. If you really want to understand and be an effective ally to non-white folks, read up on the topic.

        https://www.google.com/search?q=stress+of+racism&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b-1

      • Mumzy says:

        @equalitygadfly. Thanks for your reply. I really do appreciate it and I understand your point. You are correct that it’s not your responsibility to educate the idiots, and there comes a point where you have to cut the line and save yourself. I did read the links you sent and appreciated the articles—I’ll keep trying to educate myself and insist that my kids do the same. (My 16-year old son learned Arabic and just spent a school semester in Jordan to better learn about the Middle East. He made many friends and had honest, open conversations that forever changed his outlook.) We will keep trying to broaden our minds and make the world a better place for *all* of us. You aren’t responsible for bringing about change, but don’t lose hope that it’s possible.

      • laura-j says:

        White girl here with with (I hope) a bit more perspective than some. I grew up in a middle class white neighborhood, but my best friend (not in that I have a friend way) growing up is Black. We were beyond tight for many years, she basically lived with me for 5 years, I saw the casual racism and overt racism that hit her and sometimes to a lesser degree me in this very conservative area. Shocking the casual use of the N-word can be thrown at a couple of laughing teenage girls.

        We were like sisters, her family mine, and vice versa. I totally didn’t get it at the time, I was in that “I don’t see color” phase of my life. Embarrassing but true, but I was a teenager, she was just my friend who made me laugh and made my heart feel whole.

        I always knew I had privilege based on where I was born, the color of my skin, the socioeconomic lottery I won, but I didn’t truly get it, until a few months ago when I was driving a new car and didn’t have any papers for it when I was pulled over by the cops. They waved me away, “have a nice night ma’am”. And it hit me like a ton of bricks. I was shaken to my core, if that was my girl friend or her brother, cousin etc, it would have been REALLY different. And it should have been for me too. I didn’t have any proof that this car was mine. The stark contrast was a real wake up call to do more.

        Lesson learned, even if you think you are “woke” etc. There is always more to learn. And dear god it’s not POC’s job to teach you, just listen to them and share experiences, and stand up for them, without being asked. And check yourself. We ALL know when we say something off color. Come now. And if we are checked, take it. Learn from it and hopefully move on building real friendships.

        I hope this doesn’t make me sound like an a-hole. Coming from a good place.

      • laura-j says:

        White girl here with with (I hope) a bit more perspective than some. I grew up in a middle class white neighborhood, but my best friend (not in that I have a friend way) growing up is Black. We were beyond tight for many years, she basically lived with me for 5 years, I saw the casual racism and overt racism that hit her and sometimes to a lesser degree me in this very conservative area. Shocking the casual use of the N-word can be thrown at a couple of laughing teenage girls.

        We were like sisters, her family mine, and vice versa. I totally didn’t get it at the time, I was in that “I don’t see color” phase of my life. Embarrassing but true, but I was a teenager, she was just my friend who made me laugh and made my heart feel whole.

        I always knew I had privilege based on where I was born, the color of my skin, the socioeconomic lottery I won, but I didn’t truly get it, until a few months ago when I was driving a new car and didn’t have any papers for it when I was pulled over by the cops. They waved me away, “have a nice night ma’am”. And it hit me like a ton of bricks. I was shaken to my core, if that was my girl friend or her brother, cousin etc, it would have been REALLY different. And it should have been for me too. I didn’t have any proof that this car was mine. The stark contrast was a real wake up call to do more.

        Lesson learned, even if you think you are “woke” etc. There is always more to learn. And dear god it’s not POC’s job to teach you, just listen to them and share experiences, and stand up for them, without being asked. And check yourself. We ALL know when we say something off color. Come now. And if we are checked, take it. Learn from it and hopefully move on building real friendships.

        I’m not looking for a cookie, just wanted to share that I’m still learning. Don’t want to be an A-hole.

      • equalitygadfly says:

        Laura-j,

        You don’t sound like an a-hole at all. At least not to me. Keep making — and sharing — those realizations.

    • DP says:

      I am appalled that anyone would support the delusional, misogynistic, racist, sexist moron in the president’s office right now. Especially women! It feels like maybe they are brainwashed by their fathers or husbands? Maybe they chose to put their head in the sand bc it’s easier for them that way?

      When you grow up being treated a certain way, being told certain things, it’s hard to see outside of that. Change is scary. I was raised in a very “conservative”, “traditional” home. My parents came from difficult backgrounds and really worked their way to a place that afforded their children a better life. So there was a sense we “deserved” it. The thing I realize now though, is every child deserves a better life, but isn’t given the same chances.

      I’m so thankful for the head start my parents afforded me. I didn’t recognize I also have also benefited from white privilege. I’m sorry I didn’t see it sooner.

      I’m so sorry my awareness doesn’t change reality, but hopefully I can help break to cycle in my own family. Hopefully, making my children more aware, treating people fairly, standing up for others and voting for people who want equality… will help instead of continuing the cycle of obliviousness.

      • Merritt says:

        As much as I would like to believe they are brainwashed, the reality is they want to keep their status. There is a reason that white women were the driving force behind the romanticism of the Confederacy. Too many just don’t want to lose their status and if they got down into the trenches with POC, immigrants, LGBTQ, and other repressed groups fighting for equality, they are would have to face the uncomfortable truth that white men don’t actually romanticize white womanhood for any reason other than it helped them stay on top.

      • DP says:

        @Merritt, sadly I have to agree… a lot probably does have to do with status too. Consciously for some and subconsciously for others. I think you’re right, a lot of people who enjoy privilege may feel threatened by equality bc it does threaten the privilege they enjoy. :(

    • Iknowwhatboyslike says:

      To be frank, the white women vote for Trump and the republicans have not been surprising. People forget, that when we see pictures of those five students desegregating schools in Alabama and others in Mississippi, white women were in those pictures, faces contorted in hate along with their white men. I read an amazing article about the grassroots effort of white women in the south who aggressively lobbied to continue segregation before the Brown decision – ending segregation in schools and the U.S — and when the decision came down, they were vehemently, anti-busing. Our own U.S. Ambassador to the UN graduated from a school which main founding was in response to privilege white kids not having to go school with black children. It was their white mothers who pushed for this.

      • Sigh... says:

        “…white women were in those pictures, faces contorted in hate along with their white men.”

        I watched a documentary years ago that had a snippet of a white woman who said she didn’t have a “problem” with black people, but why should she HAVE to live next to them. Why can’t “they” can stay “over there?” THIS passive aggressiveness, while not as obvious, is STILL racism they REFUSE to recognize/address in themselves.

      • DP says:

        Honestly, I’m surprised that anyone voted for Trump at all… except blatant racists, sexual predators and corrupt cronies.
        But you are right… those white men and women back then raised children who are now raising children… some of their warped beliefs probably passed down the line. I’m still shocked by it though.
        Most of my close friends are white women. Most of them did not vote for Trump. The very few I suspect that did (they don’t tell me bc I hate Trump), seem like reasonable, kind people. They’re not blatant or casual racists to my knowledge, or else I wouldn’t be friends with them. They are kind, friendly people as far as I can see… so where’s the disconnect for them? How can you be a kind, friendly person and vote for Trump?!

    • Milla says:

      Honestly, i am still in denial when it comes to USA. The level of racism and the fact that you feel so unsafe in your country is beyond me.

      How can a fcking nazi group have any kind of march in 21.century? Is anyone else as confused, cos WW2 wasn’t that long ago and it was war on black people, jewish people, homosexuals and also the rest of the planet. It’s all insane, diabolical.

    • Mumzy says:

      Sorry wrong spot

    • ol cranky says:

      sadly, some of the people responsible for this heinous Trumptopian administration are those on the far left who claimed the only way to advance the causes they hold dear was to maintain some bizarre stance that they were OK helping to ensure a Clinton loss because she’s not progressive enough. Jill Stein and the Bernie or Busters (and, IMNSHO, Bernie to a certain extent) were all too willing to help spread the Russian/Trumpian disinformation campaign and, in truth, they did that because they hated her more than they cared about advancing progressive values

      This said (as a Jew who had family that dealt with both the Nazis/Russians/Poles during WWW and the Pogroms before that) I absolutely understand the suggestion to let the racists march to crickets instead of showing up at the hate rallies to protest. The RWNJ are like Trump – they want an audience to antagonize & attack, and without counter-protesters the thousands or millions they want to think attend their rallies and make them so strong would be seen for the weak groups they are. A larger counter-protest elsewhere may well distract media and leave them without the “cowering” audience they crave

    • Frizzy and frazzled says:

      Don’t make assumptions. I’m a disabled person with an invisible disability – I’m almost completely bedridden. People have said horrible things to me, even medical professionals – tone deaf, lacking empathy, accusatory and worst of all disbelieving. People from groups with less privelege are not necessarily more empathetic, unfortunately.

  3. Lucy2 says:

    The problem is they won’t stay in the void of nothingness. Unless people are pushing back, they’re going to grow.

    I haven’t watch this yet, but good for her for asking Dave about his writing room.

  4. Snowflake says:

    I’m torn on that. Because I feel like giving them attention gives them fuel. But at the same time, I dont think we should let them go unchecked. They love to have a victim mentality. Oh, i can’t have free speech? Kind of b.s. idk what the best way to fight them is. But you know, in charlottesville, they were walking down the street with guns and the cops let them! I guess if it’s an open carry state, cops can’t do anything. But that was not a fair battle. The Nazis came armed and wanting to fight. The counter protesters were normal everyday people who didn’t expect it to be that violent. They came for peaceful protest, the Nazis came for war. I see comments online sometimes about get ready for the next civil war. That’s fine. They will get a big shock. Lots of white people will be fighting against them if that were to happen.

    • Betsy says:

      So we should go for mocking racists. At or around the time of Charlottesville, those racist nincompoops were marching somewhere and a rather inventive fellow marched alongside them, playing the most ridiculous tune on his tuba. It put those racists where they belong: as mockable trash.

  5. PoodleMama says:

    But are radical racists really a fringe group of crazies? Groups like the KKK have been active since the civil war. They’re not a toddler throwing a tantrum that it is best to just ignore. They’re an entrenched group in American society.

    • Umyeah says:

      I was wondering how many people actually perscribe to these racist ideals? I know there a lot of people who voted for Trump because he promised them jobs but i dont think they were racist, selfish perhaps yes. I think i just want to hope it is a small fringe group and not a big group.

      • Natalie S. says:

        If someone enables racism by voting for someone like Trump, that person is racist. It was very clear what he supported and helping him achieve power to make that happen is being complicit in it happening.

      • Umyeah says:

        Sorry Natalie but i think thats a very simplistic view. I think we have to understand what led some people to vote for Trump and what led so many people to not vote at all. To just yell in someones face that they are racist bc they voted for him may not achieve positive reactions. Perhaps having productive conversations (wherein we dont demean or insult each other) may lead to greater understanding of each individuals perspective and ensure that next time Trump doesnt get in. To be clear I am not a Trump supporter in ANY way but do think things need to be done to open up conversation or Trump will be elected again.

      • Veronica S. says:

        We are responsible for the people our vote puts into power. We don’t get to vote part of a candidate into office. We get the whole package.

        That, and if any of his supporters bothered to research their candidate instead of acting on gut instinct, they’d know his budget and “jobs” plans were being torn apart by economic journals for being unrealistic and oversimplified. The recently passed tax legislation is just one example of how little this man understands about macroeconomic issues.

      • equalitygadfly says:

        @umyeah: I disagree, completely. I wish I was feeling better today, and had the brain power and energy to type a full response. But, in short…we’ve been doing what you suggest for decades, and look where we’ve ended up: with the most outwardly racist president in modern history. We spend so much time wringing our hands about the feelings of 45s supporters and casual racists. No longer! All your tactic does is keep the status quo firmly in place, and the status quo is hella racist.

        Anyone who voted for 45 is a racist. Period.

      • Umyeah says:

        Veronica i totally see what you are saying however i wonder how many people actually take the time to validate claims made by candidates. There is a bit of blind ignorance that a lot of people perscribe to when it comes to politicians, believing them to tell the truth when thats probably not the case. I think can be blinded by their own needs.

      • imqrious2 says:

        Veronica, “his” tax package (Dump’s) had NOTHING to do with him. It was put together by Republithugs, whose strings were being pulled by their high donating backers. It was ALL payback for those campaign “contributions”.

      • Umyeah says:

        @equalitygadfly ughhhhhh all im saying is talk to people, have the coversation about why they voted for him without assumption of racism perhaps that would shed some light into why he was elected and ensure it doesnt happen again.

      • equalitygadfly says:

        @Umyeah — Again, we HAVE BEEN talking to people, for years. Moreover, we don’t live in vacuum. We’ve all heard the reasons Trump supporters give. They want to drain swamps and bring back coal jobs! Fine.

        Regardless of whether people had “valid” reasons for voting Trump, they were able to overlook the blatant racism that shaped his campaign. Anyone who can brush that aside and vote for Trump is, by default, a racist. And that was the original statement, that 45 supporters are racist. They are. Could they have voted for him for another reason? Sure. But the mere act of voting for him means you don’t give a snap about racism, making every single one of his supporters complicit in ensuring that racism continues.

      • Natalie S. says:

        If you support racists, you are racist. That’s the bottom line. No yelling involved. White fragility keeps the truth from being discussed and without that we can’t move forward. People are more uncomfortable with the term than the behavior.

        White entitlement led to Trump becoming president. Tip toeing around it will make them feel good and then they’ll go out and vote the next Trump in and go on about how no one understands them. Where are his supporters holding him accountable? The solution isn’t in Trump supporters; it’s everyone else showing up to vote and fighting to make sure people can vote.

        Stop coddling these people. They’re entitled, not alienated. They thought Trump would be a golem for their own desires.

      • DP says:

        If anyone voted for Trump, they are condoning his racist and sexist views and behavior… therefore they are complicent. There no way around it.
        I would say sexism got Trump into office more than racism did though. People were more willing to have a unqualified, immoral male than to have a qualified, experienced female.

    • Betsy says:

      Yes, radical racists are still the fringe. Regular racists are frightfully common.

      • DP says:

        I just learned the term “casual” racist. Sadly, I think it’s really common and often disguised as humor. Ugh. Not ok. Ever.

  6. Mar says:

    “Ignore the bullies” is advice you give to your second grader. I understand the don’t feed the trolls sentiment, but ignoring/sweeping racism under the rug is EXACTLY why we are where we are as a nation right now. We allowed these POSs to grow quietly in the shadows until they felt safe enough to emerge. We need to show up and say NOPE. NOT OK AND WE SHOULD HAVE BEEN SHOUTING THIS ALL ALONG.

    • NameChange says:

      I tell my son “ignore the bullies, UNLESS one of them touches you, in which case, cave his face in.” These Nazis are touching us in that they are emboldening the GOP to pass laws that directly affect our (women and people of color) quality of life. But we need “cave their faces in” by going out to vote, through town halls where we let our representatives hear our concerns, and by running for office. We don’t do it by giving them more attention. JMO

    • equalitygadfly says:

      “ignoring/sweeping racism under the rug is EXACTLY why we are where we are as a nation right now.”

      THIS!

  7. Marjorie says:

    I’d rather talk about Heather Heyer than you, Tina.

    • CCBB says:

      Tina Fey, aka former mean girl victim (pretending to have been a mean girl), is as boring as Vienna Sausage (at least w/out hot sauce). I keep using silly analogies about how annoying this type of celebrity is, but I can’t help myself —she’s gross and overrated.

      I understand the ignorance of her joke and for an ETHNIC white woman she’s still has that white privy mentality as any northern European white out there….. I guess that helps even more so after you make millions for entertaining other mean girl victims who adorb you while the rest of us still hurl at her comedy skills.
      So yes that’s what I’m more annoyed with….Tina Fey as a comedic manipulator. But to many of y’alls’ point, kudos and so true!

  8. Nicole says:

    Pretty sure ignoring the reality of racism in America is exactly how we got to this point. Because no one cared except those of us that knew America was still a racist h*llhole the entire time.
    There was an article on my Twitter that talked about how white women are the most dangerous demographic and it was absolutely right. They will uphold white supremacy in a heartbeat. Fight for progress while holding minorities at an arms length. It’s why I hated Pantsuit Nation and won’t support the women’s march. Intersectionality is a step to far and too hard for them.
    Also I really hope CB is covering Glover’s SNL appearance. I really want to discuss This is America on here!

    • Goldengirllover34 says:

      Agree with you. It’s easy to ignore if it doesn’t affect you. Say that to a black person who knows exactly what this means. Same crap, different year.

      Also, would love to talk about this Donald Glover as well. The video was jaw dropping. I have watched it multiple times and i know I’m still missing some stuff. So many feelings.

  9. DesertReal says:

    David Letterman is a hypocrite that still doesn’t hire women to produce or contribute creativity to his show.
    Unfortunately, I don’t have the gumption to unpack any of those other topics right now.

    • CCBB says:

      Here, maybe I can help: David Letterman is as funny as Tina Fey who’s as funny as vienna sausage (w/out hot sauce) soggy cardboard, diapers…my pre cockroach infestation before the summer rolls in…. and carrot ice cream. Plus, he still thinks he’s a lady’s man. ew.

  10. Veronica S. says:

    Honestly, this likely has as much to do with her class privilege as her race. When you’re wealthy and famous, you aren’t touched by the same socioeconomic repercussions of life as everybody else. It’s easy to get detached from the reality of how serious and dangerous it is.

  11. TheOriginalMe says:

    Nicole, I agree. We need to be discussing This is America here. It’s an incredible piece of commentary on race, guns, and our culture’s vacuity. It’s a piece of art. I’m already on my 11th viewing. Every second of that video is packed with symbolism and meaning. So many layers of it too.

    TBH, Donald Glover’s perspective is far more interesting to me than Tina’s.

  12. DP says:

    As far as Tina’s skit goes, I get what she was saying. The idea that, we shouldn’t give them power by paying attention to them, makes sense… Except that what they’re doing is too hateful to be ignored! Ignoring these hate groups while our disgusting president is supporting them is not going to work. We need to say NO! NO! NO!

  13. Marty says:

    This is Tina Fey though, white feminist MVP. She has the luxury of talking about racism in such a dismissive way because it does not directly affect her. This has been her M.O. for years, if you ever do a rewatch of 30 Rock, the way she writes about race is very telling.

  14. Helen Smith says:

    I admit it. I wouldn’t go. It will end up being a violent poop show.

    Instead, I don’t vote for any fascists.