Tom Ford “lusts” for beautiful women, but only as objects of art

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Tom Ford has a new, wonderful interview in Interview Magazine. The piece was conducted by artist John Currin, who is somewhat close and friendly with Ford. You can tell that Tom feels comfortable with Currin – Tom really opens up. Not that it’s too difficult to get Tom Ford to give you a good quote. Since the launch of his new women’s line, Tom has given major interviews to all of the major American and European fashion magazines, and all of them have been awesome. He’s a fascinating man with lots to say. And even though I had to put away my heterosexual lust for Tom’s fabulousness after his wonderfully written piece about his partner of 24 years, my lust is now back on with this piece. Tom utters these lines: “I lust after beautiful women. First of all, I love women. But I lust after beautiful women in the way that I lust after a beautiful piece of sculpture—this will probably get me in trouble—or a beautiful car. I believe everyone’s on a sliding scale of sexuality. There are moments where I am sexually attracted to women. But it doesn’t overpower my first impulse; my lust for them is the same as my lust for beauty in all things. It’s not like I ever think, ‘Oh, my god, I’ve got to spread her legs and f-ck her.’” So he lusts after women like he lusts after a piece of art. I will accept that. The full Interview Magazine is here (totally worth a read if you have the time), and here are some of the highlights:

Tom Ford on whether he sees his sexual imagery and sexualized fashion as “calculated”: It is never even calculated. When I’m making an image of a woman, or dressing a woman—I have a reputation for sex and making a woman sexy, and men as well—but I don’t start out saying, “Oh, I’m gonna make this woman look sexy or sexual.” I simply stand there and put her in front of me and say, “What can I do to make her more beautiful in my eyes? Let’s pull in the dress here, let’s do this, let’s do that.” The end result is something that other people consider sexual, but for me it’s just beautiful. My expression of beauty is something I do naturally. I love the human body—the female body, the male body. I work in a way to try to enhance the body, and so you often see a lot of the body or the silhouette or outline, and that’s what people equate with sex. But I’m very comfortable with sexuality. It’s not anything that’s ever freaked me out. I’m very comfortable with naked bodies. Someone asked me recently about male nudity, and I brought up the subject that, in our culture, we use female nudity to sell everything. We’re very comfortable objectifying women. Women go out and they are basically wearing nothing. Their feet and toes are exposed, their legs are exposed, their breasts are exposed. Everything is exposed—the neck, the arms. You have to be really physically perfect, as a woman, in our culture to be considered beautiful. But full frontal male nudity challenges us. It makes men nervous. It makes women nervous. Other times in history, male nudes have been regarded in a different way. The Olympics were originally held nude.

On whether he objectifies women: I think I detach the physical from the spiritual. It’s my business to make a woman or a man beautiful, and I’m working with a model in a fitting, and I’ve objectified them to the point that they become an object. They’re something that I’m modeling or shaping or sculpting, but I’m very aware that even though I make them physically beautiful, their soul and personality and character is somewhat detached from that. It’s great when you have a combination of the two— that’s what makes a true beauty. Some people are physically beautiful but yet they’re completely uninteresting, and thus they’re not beautiful. I detach the two. And I turn the same eye on myself: When I look in the mirror, I say, “Well, this eyebrow is starting to sag,” or “I’m going gray right here, I need to fix that.” Or “I’ve eaten too much. I need to do a few more push-ups, blah blah blah.” But that’s completely separate from me as a human being. It’s purely the body that I move through the world in, and people react to it on the surface. So, no, I don’t have any remorse, because I separate them.

On his lust for women: I lust after beautiful women. First of all, I love women. But I lust after beautiful women in the way that I lust after a beautiful piece of sculpture—this will probably get me in trouble—or a beautiful car. I believe everyone’s on a sliding scale of sexuality. There are moments where I am sexually attracted to women. But it doesn’t overpower my first impulse; my lust for them is the same as my lust for beauty in all things. It’s not like I ever think, “Oh, my god, I’ve got to spread her legs and f-ck her.”

On regret: This may sound corny, but the only thing I feel remorse about is when I hurt someone, hurt their feelings, or make them feel bad. I’m obsessive about that. “Oh, my god, did I say the wrong thing? Did I hurt them? Did they understand what I meant?” But the creation of visual images or design, I have no remorse over. I’m not somebody who regrets anything, because I’m very happy with where I am and everything I’ve done in my life. Everything that’s happened to me, I’ve learned a lesson from—or if I didn’t, I was foolish, and I will repeat the same thing and eventually, hopefully, I will learn a lesson.

On America versus Europe: I think we’re very uptight in America. You have to remember that we’re descended from Puritans. Whether or not the country is now composed of immigrants, our culture as American really begins with the landing of the Pilgrims and a puritanical view of things. It was a group of people who escaped Europe because they felt it was depraved in a certain way, and that culture still permeates. I’ve lived in Europe for the last 20 years, so I’m kind of a hybrid. I feel very American in certain ways, and in lots of ways I feel more European.

[From Interview Magazine]

Tom also has some junk to say about France, and how terrible it is that the French are so nationalistic, which evens out his comments about America. He says that out of all of the European countries, he feels most at home in Italy, and that the Italians have always embraced him. He also tells a story about doing an interview completely naked, just because. I can’t be mad at him, even if he would never feel the need to spread my legs.

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Photos courtesy of WENN.

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16 Responses to “Tom Ford “lusts” for beautiful women, but only as objects of art”

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  1. kristen says:

    oh my. he is sexy. isn’t he from new mexico?

  2. jaw says:

    gahhh i love him

  3. Nanea says:

    A huge mug of coffee and then finding this, perfect timing.

    I really like TF, his versatility, but especially that he gave “A Single Man” to Colin F.

  4. Cel says:

    His comments regarding the sexual imagery not being calculated don’t ring true when you look at the print advertisements for his aftershave.

  5. redlips says:

    Good gawd!

    Oh, how I would love to undo his diamond studs, one stud at a time! He wreaks of sex and understands women. Wouldn’t it be nice if a straight man had all of his qualities. Phew!

    Thank you, Kaiser! I needed that!

  6. Quest says:

    Kaiser: his eyes, omfg…his eyes just strip you down …weak, weak, can’t go on.

  7. Delta Juliet says:

    He might not feel the need to spread a woman’s legs and do naughty things to her, but his eyes say different ;)

    Gawd he’s hot

  8. imherenow says:

    Thanks for the morning pick me up.That man is too hot for his own good.He’s just too fine…

  9. Melissa says:

    Can’t stand this guy! And his eyes are too close together.

  10. Ally says:

    Can’t stand this guy. He was a great designer with Gucci, but he’s full of himself, objectifies women (it’s bad whether you’re straight or not), and makes terrible movies — A Single Man was stupefyingly boring, and a student film ripoff of Death in Venice (with a dash of Mad Men style for extra coattail-riding) to boot. If he never makes another it will be too soon.
    http://www.filmschoolrejects.com/reviews/review-a-single-man-rlevn.php

  11. bluhare says:

    Tom!!! Come lust after me! I’m a piece of art, really! Well, my husband usually says “piece of work” but that’s art, right?

  12. jane says:

    The second picture of him with no tie and buttoned down shirt is so sexy. I always thought he was pretty handsome/good looking, esp. for a designer.

  13. bee says:

    It’s funny how you can’t find a bad picture of him. I think he rehearses the sexy face in the mirror, he always looks the exact same (great) way.

    Maybe he doesn’t mean it in an obyectifying way. I’m a straight girl and I can perfectly see the beauty of other women, either in paintings or in real life

  14. what? says:

    oh fuck off tom ford. if you were about making teh mens as sexy as teh ladies YOU would have been naked as well as Keira and Scarlett on that infamous magazine cover.

  15. cprincess says:

    Hes a fucking hot piece!