Life & Style: Chris Pratt and Anna Faris are in counseling


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I was among those surprised to hear that Anna Faris and Chris Pratt were splitting up after eight years of marriage. Chris used his Facebook page to announce their separation earlier this month. After the announcement was made, the speculation about what caused the split ran rampant. Despite (quickly squashed) rumors that Jenifer Lawrence played home wrecker, it appears that Chris’ busy work schedule seems to be the prime culprit.

But, before you pour one out for another failed celebrity relationship, there may be a light at the end of the tunnel. A source told Life & Style magazine that Ana and Chris are seeing a counselor. An insider told the magazine, “It’s the first time they’ve ever been in counseling together and it only happened after they split. They have committed to it. They are trying to keep the pressure low by doing it out of the spotlight, but there is still a lot of love between them.”

The 38-year-old actor and his 40-year-old wife, parents to adorable 4-year-old son, Jack, look to be facing quite the uphill battle if they’re hoping to save their marriage. Says the source, “It’s been very intense, with Anna discussing how she feels isolated with Chris gone so much of the time and her career taking a backseat. Chris gets frustrated because Anna is in the industry, too, and knew the commitments involved when she married him.”

Even if the counseling reveals that they should ultimately divorce, Anna is handling her situation like a champ. Her Mom co-star, Allison Janney, recently complimented her TV daughter, telling E! News“She just is a trooper. She comes to work with a smile on her face. “She’s a professional. I love her to death.”

Of course, this story could be just another rumor, but I do hope they are giving counseling a chance. I went to counseling for both of my marriages, and, although they both ended in divorce, counseling was able to give my exes and myself a true sense of closure, removing the nagging worry of “What ifs?” Hopefully, it will help these two. I wouldn’t let either of them near a pet ever again, but they’re good parents to Jack and they do make a cute couple. Whatever they decide, I hope they’re happy.

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24 Responses to “Life & Style: Chris Pratt and Anna Faris are in counseling”

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  1. Priscilla says:

    They broke up because of her drinking problem. This is a rumour put out specifically to try to shade that fact from view.

    Also why anyone would care about a couple who abuse and abandon animals is beyond my comprehension.

    • magnoliarose says:

      Her alcoholism was starting to become too much of the story. I don’t blame him for wanting out. If the addict doesn’t stop or get help then their partner is entitled to walk away guilt free.

      The animal abuse is sickening. I do wonder if drinking was involved with that too. No excuse of course but it isn’t out of the realm of possibility.

      • ArchieGoodwin says:

        Thank for for the reminder. I was feeling all, oh good I hope they work it, but then read your comment and now, couldn’t give a sh*t.

        Hope their kid is ok in all this.

      • magnoliarose says:

        @ArchieGoodwin

        Her problem is very serious. Someone pointed out to me that his quest for religion has to do with the state of their marriage and looking for answers. One day he probably just wasn’t up for trying or begging or fixing or dealing anymore.

        Before I met my husband I dated a great guy with a drinking/drug problem. I remember how much I wanted him to stop and how he changed when he was drinking. I was anxious when we socialized and then I caught myself calling friends to check on him when I was away working.
        In my case, I was free to end it with no strings attached but it was enough to experience a tiny glimpse of what life with an addict looked like.

        I can’t fathom what it is like for people like him with families and commitment. If they are going to counseling to try to co-parent and for closure, I think that is healthy.

      • ArchieGoodwin says:

        Thanks for the information and perspective magnolia. You are right, if counselling helps her, than that’s all the better for her child and life.

        I can’t forget the animal abuse, so I hope she (and he) get help for that as well.

    • Nicole says:

      Well it’s part that and part his cheating. Those rumors have been everywhere for a year now. I don’t think it was one thing but a combination of all of it

    • ERIN says:

      Get off your high horse. These people are human beings; and as such, are flawed. What do you really know about them other than what you read in Rag Mags or sites such as this??

    • Annetommy says:

      Maybe because they care about children as well as animals?

  2. Joss RED says:

    Well, if counseling doesn’t work out, they can always go hunt together, since it’s his number one hobby, and both of them have no respect at all for animal lives.

    A couple who kills together, stays together…

  3. okeedokee says:

    Honestly curious, where is the info about her alcoholism and animal abuse coming from? I’ve never heard either?

  4. mkyarwood says:

    Hey ladies, blaming a drinking problem that hasn’t been confirmed, and may in fact be exacerbated by relationship problems, is still blaming a woman for being vulnerable. Until she runs someone over, her problems aren’t ‘the problem’. My husband has stuck by me during my low points, and I have done the same. He left once, we worked through it. It’s too easy to say ‘she drinks too much’ and ‘he is looking at other women’. The reality is, people change, goals change, but unless there’s some kind of emotional abuse going on, it’s really worth it to go back to zero, talk things out and see what page you’re both on. The animal abuse has no excuse, and is the fault of both parties.

    • Squiggisbig says:

      Running someone over is not the barometer of when drinking has become a problem.

    • alternative fact says:

      “Until she runs someone over, her problems aren’t ‘the problem’.”

      There is a huge difference between having standard relationship issues or experiencing life’s natural highs and lows and living with an active addict. I’m sure this comment sounds harsh, but “talking it out” is no use when there is a good chance that one party is too impaired to remember or participate in discussion. I agree that it’s easy to point fingers at another party’s behavior but addiction is its own beast. It’s painful to really love someone but to never know if you’re going to encounter the person you fell in love with or someone who can be totally unpredictable and undependable or even abusive. You can certainly be supportive of someone who is struggling, but if they do not want to make changes there is a real possibility that you will go crazy before you can love them out of addiction.

  5. Joey says:

    “Chris gets frustrated because Anna is in the industry, too, and knew the commitments involved when she married him.”

    This is basically confirming that he thinks his career is more important than hers, if you ask me. It’s like saying “Well she married me so she should’ve known she’d have to take a backseat.”