Debbie Reynolds passes away one day after losing her daughter, Carrie Fisher

DebbieReynolds
In yet more incredibly sad news to close out the year, Debbie Reynolds, Carrie Fisher’s mother, suffered a stroke at her son Todd’s home yesterday and was rushed to hospital. She passed away at the age of 84, just one day after losing her daughter, Carrie, from a heart attack. Debbie’s son, Todd, spoke to E! and TMZ about his mom and said that she was under a lot of stress from losing Carrie and that she said she wanted wanted to be with her. He told E! “She held it together beautifully, obviously, for the last couple of days but she was under a lot of emotion and stress from the loss [of Carrie] and it’s pretty much what triggered this event.” To TMZ he said that Debbie told him earlier that day “I miss her so much, I want to be with Carrie.”

Debbie was Hollywood royalty and she reinvented herself several times in her long career, which was launched by an appearance at 18 in Singin’ in The Rain. She married her first husband, Carrie and Todd’s father, Eddie Fisher, in 1955 and that marriage ended in divorce when Eddie left Debbie to marry her best friend, Elizabeth Taylor, which was a huge scandal at the time. Debbie starred in over thirty films and made the move to television in 1969 with her own show, The Debbie Reynolds Show. She went on to a stage career in her 40s including singing and dancing, she released albums, she owned a Las Vegas casino in her 60s and she collected Hollywood memorabilia including iconic costumes and props, later selling her collection for millions. She was active with roles in television and on tv movies well into her 80s, including a role in the 2013 HBO special, Beyond the Candelabra, as Liberace’s mom. Debbie was also known for her philanthropy, she was active for over fifty years in the organization The Thalians, which is dedicated to mental health issues. Here’s part of her obituary, from People:

Reynolds soon starred in a string of crowd-pleasers, including The Affairs of Dobie Gillis (’53), Susan Slept Here (’54) and The Tender Trap (’55), opposite Frank Sinatra. She and Sinatra became pals. “He was very good to me and gave me some very good advice that I did not listen to,” Reynolds told PEOPLE in a 2015 interview. “He said, ‘Don’t marry Eddie.’ He said you shouldn’t get married to a singer. We’re not faithful.” Eddie was, of course, Eddie Fisher, the first great love of Reynolds’ life, whom she wed in 1955. He was the father of her two children, Carrie and Todd…

Reynolds was also a prolific recording artist at the time, making the hit gold record “Tammy” from her 1957 film, Tammy and the Bachelor, and putting out an eponymous album in 1959. In the wake of her divorce, she also went on to make dozens of pictures, including John Ford’s How the West Was Won (’62); The Unsinkable Molly Brown (’64), for which she was nominated for an Academy Award; and The Singing Nun (’66), which spun off into a TV show.

In her personal life, Reynolds didn’t stay heartbroken for long. She wed businessman Harry Karl in 1960, in a union that lasted for 13 years, then was married to real-estate developer Richard Hamlett from 1984 to 1996.

Meanwhile, Reynolds developed a deep passion for something else — Hollywood memorabilia. It started in 1970, when the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studio sold off its huge collection, with Reynolds picking up every piece she could buy. She went on to amass more objects: Marilyn Monroe’s famous dress from The Seven Year Itch, the blue gingham dress Judy Garland wore as Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz, Charlie Chaplin’s bowler hat, and thousands more items of clothing and props from Hollywood’s golden era. “The studios should have taken each of their famous articles and preserved the history,” she told PEOPLE. “But they didn’t do that. They didn’t feel it was very important.”

But Reynolds did. She collected so much, that she fought long and hard to create a Hollywood museum, briefly installing many of the pieces in her Debbie Reynolds Hollywood Hotel in Las Vegas. The business eventually folded, forcing Reynolds to offer her pieces in multiple auctions that raised millions of dollars.

But even during her years of collecting, working with charities and dealing with business ventures and failings, Reynolds never tired of being onscreen. She memorably played Albert Brooks’ irascible mom in the 1996 film Mother, and Liberace’s in Steven Soderbergh’s 2013 TV movie Behind the Candelabra. She guest-starred on everything from Wings to Will & Grace, Rugrats to Roseanne.

Reynolds also took it upon herself to heal fractured relationships. After years of tension with daughter Carrie, the two had a rapprochement, maintaining a close relationship until Fisher’s death. Reynolds even made up with Taylor, approaching her on the Queen Elizabeth cruise ship and rekindling a friendship of “many, many years,” she recalled. They starred together in the 2001 TV movie These Old Broads, written by Carrie.

[From People]

Debbie received an honorary Academy Award last year for her work with The Thalians and she received a Life Achievement Award from the Screen Actors Guild in 2014.

As People mentions, Debbie and Carrie were estranged from each other for some time, but they reconnected, became very close and lived right next door to each other. My heart goes out to their family and especially to Billie Lourd, Carrie’s daughter, who lost both her mom and her grandmother right after the holidays. I hope she has her family and friends around her and that she’s hugging her sweet dog, Tina, and her mom’s dog, Gary.

Variety posted this interview of Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds from Oprah in 2011. It’s fascinating. At about 12:30, after they play a clip from Carrie’s Wishful Drinking special where she said her dad, Eddie Fisher, consoled Elizabeth Taylor after her husband’s death “with his penis,” Debbie makes a sign with her index finger and thumb showing the length Fisher went to. Damn! Around 18:00 they talk about Debbie’s second marriage, to millionaire Harry Karl, when she lost everything. They discuss Carrie’s mental breakdown and their estrangement as well. Both Carrie and Debbie are hilarious and so candid about everything they’ve gone through.

2011 Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards - Arrivals

photos credit: WENN, FameFlynet, Getty, Debbie Reynolds and PRPhotos

 

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139 Responses to “Debbie Reynolds passes away one day after losing her daughter, Carrie Fisher”

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  1. Nicole says:

    I’m so done with this entire year

  2. Scar says:

    this is the saddest thing ever

    • The Other Katherine says:

      It’s sad for us, and for Debbie’s son and Carrie’s daughter, but it’s a blessing for Debbie. Outliving your child is a cruel sentence.

    • CItyHeat says:

      It is. But I laughed through the tears at this……

      “Layered on top of the sad, astonishing fact that mother-daughter Hollywood fixtures Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher died within a day of each other, there is an irony the wickedly funny and self-aware Fisher would have appreciated: even in death, her mom stole the spotlight.”–Vanity Fair

  3. Desmond says:

    Tbh i sort of expected this. It’s quite sad. i hope the daughter is able to deal with this rationally.
    Imagine planning two burials at the same time. ugh.

  4. nicole says:

    Absolutely beyond devastating news. I’m soooo sad for Billy.

  5. Jan says:

    This is beyond sad. I watched 20/20 last Friday and they had a special about all the big stars we lost this year. I was dumbfounded by the number of them that really were huge icons. In less than a week three big names have been added to the list . Very sad year.

  6. Margo S. says:

    Holy effing crap. Just saw this on flipboard and didn’t believe it. I’ve been googling trying to find info about this being a hoax. Is this real?! Her mom died a day later?!?!?!

  7. Rico Shew says:

    The used to talk about the 27 Club. In years to come they’ll be tralking about the 2016 Club

  8. LAK says:

    I adored Debbie Reynolds. More so than Carrie. Carrie was like a smart witty friend, but Debbie was sunshine and ridiculousness and always had an incredible turn of phrase. You can see where Carrie got her wit. I was so happy a new generation got to see her perform in Will & Grace.

    I’m truly sad that Debbie Reynolds is dead, and Carrie of course.

    I’m off to watch SINGING IN THE RAIN fot the upteenth time.

    • Jan says:

      Debbie Reynolds was truly an icon – a multitalented dynamo, wasn’t she? LAK, if you want to see her comedic timing, she played Debra Messing’s mother on Will & Grace. OMG, she was fantastically funny in that. RIP to both of them. My heart braks for the family.

      • LAK says:

        Those are my favourite episodes. They still get me every time though the show isn’t as funny to me anymore. Mind you, the Matt Damon episode also stands out. Pre-Jason Bourne days and just being an actor.

        The only time i felt she fell flat was the movie ONE FOR THE MONEY, but that movie was miscast and ill-conceived. I know it had been in development hell for over 15years, but they really didn’t have to go with the version they put out. Every aspect of it was problematic, not just Debbie’s casting. For her part, Debbie’s brand of humour/performance wasn’t ratchett enough for the role.

      • Lady D says:

        Debbie doing her “I told you so” dance in Grace’s living room? Truly one of the funniest scenes I have ever seen Debbie in. I was delighted to see her on Will and Grace.

    • SusanneToo says:

      Turner Classic Movies has a monthly big screen series. Every month they show a film in a theatre in its original glory. On January 15th it’s Singin’ in the Rain(it was already long scheduled). I saw Singin’ in 1952 and will see it again for about the thirtieth time. Debbie was 19 years old, singing and dancing and holding her own with Gene Kelly and Donald O’Connor. She was magnificent. You(all here) owe it to yourself to see one of the greatest movies ever made. It was Debbie’s first lead role and her talent was on full display.

      • bluhare says:

        If you haven’t seen the youtube link LAK posted, you should. She tells a great anecdote about the making of that film.

      • Christin says:

        Count me as one who followed Debbie more than Carrie. As a classic film buff, I knew Debbie from her earlier performances. My mother was a 1950s teen who filled in the story about the infamous triangle, and clued me into Debbie’s ‘Tammy’ movies (which are funny and showcase her lovable , strong personality).

        Her last attempt to locate her memorabilia collection would have been within two hours’ drive for me, but unfortunately did not materialize. She wanted to share that history.

      • LAK says:

        Christin: i love the story of how Debbie rescued the costumes from the back lot of the studios where they were just going to be dumped because the then new owner of the studios didn’t value their worth nor did he think any money could be made from them.

        There is a documentary somewhere of how Debbie discovered the fate of the costumes and fundraised to buy the lot from the studio to preserve hollywood history and to exhibit them.

        Eventually she couldn’t afford to maintain the museum she’d created for the costumes and sold the lot.

        That’s the only reason those costumes are still with us today.

        SusanneToo: it is my favourite musical. I’ve seen every version of it, including a ballet, can quote it backwards and forwards.

        I’m sad to watch it this time because of Debbie, but it brings me such joy every time.

      • SusanneToo says:

        @Christin. I was thirteen yo when all that happened in 1958 and followed it closely. There was no social media back then, but, even so, it was bigger than the Brad/Angie/Jen story ever got. There’s a famous picture of Debbie facing the press after the news broke, with a diaper pin in her shirt. Debbie and Liz were both too good for Eddie.

      • M.A.F. says:

        Re: the costumes
        I’m surprised she didn’t donate them to the Smithsonian.

      • M.A.F. says:

        Sent it multiple times. Stupid computer.

      • Christin says:

        @MAF – Debbie says in the linked video that she was getting older and wanted to free up some of the money she’d invested for her “old age”. That collection was a major asset of hers. I have also read about some financial difficulties related to the museums that may have been a reason to finally relinquish her massive collection.

        When the Pigeon Forge (TN) museum failed to happen, a bankruptcy court valued the collection at around $11M and I think it ultimately brought over $20M.

      • LAK says:

        She needed the money after a lifetime of dead beat husbands saddling her with crippling debt.

        Christin: In the video, she downplays her financial situation, but she’s much more candid in her biography.

        She started out wanting to preserve the costumes for nostalgia’s sake especially when she discovered they were going to be dumped by a studio recently sold to a wall street type who only valued studio’s brand name. The bulk of her costumes came from that particular sale.

        The original idea was to create a museum for them either financed by her or bring in a partner like Pigeon Forge for same.

        Sadly, whilst she worked to pay those debts off, ultimately it was impossible without selling off some of the costumes which she had come to realise were very valuable indeed.

      • Christin says:

        @LAK – At one point, Todd was reportedly living in an RV near the Pigeon Forge site, trying to drum up other investors to help fund the museum (which was to be part of a much larger project near Dollywood). How I looked forward to that museum being located within driving distance, but it wasn’t to be. I’m sure she felt bittersweet about having to sell items she had the foresight to save.

        Here is a 2009 article from a Tennessee newspaper about Todd’s involvement in trying to come up with an alternative plan for the museum:

        http://archive.knoxnews.com/business/debbie-reynolds-son-hopes-to-find-investors-for-belle-island-village-ep-409976548-359377431.html

  9. Jess says:

    My God, how incredibly sad. “She wanted to be with Carrie”, brought me to tears. I can’t imagine living in this world without my daughter and how awful that must be, obviously broke her to the core. She was a legend and will be missed, I feel so bad for the family:(

  10. Rico Shew says:

    Bet you someone does one of those tacky entertainment icons paintings incorporating all the people who have died this year. Ugh.

  11. Hadtobesaid says:

    Poor Debbie, she wanted to be with her baby and died of a broken heart.

    R.I.P. Carrie & Debbie

  12. Digital Unicorn (aKa Betti) says:

    So sad ur they r together now. My prayers for their families.

    2016 isn’t over and is trying to pack them in. Not over yet and I feel it’s saving the biggest till last.

  13. Ramona says:

    I love Carrie. I mean in a stan way, not just in a regular observers way. And after years of watching her clips and reading her books, I think it is in order to say that IF theres an afterlife, Queen Carrie is probably doing a standup routine in which she gripes about mother stealing her thunder even in death. And Debbie is smiling filled with pride for her daughter in the background and occasionally making goofy “who, me? I would never” facial expressions.

  14. Lucy says:

    Not surprising, sadly. At least they’re together now. Sending all my love and best wishes to Billie and the rest of the family.

  15. smcollins says:

    When the news first broke about her being rushed to the hospital I said to my husband that her daughter’s death was going to kill her. So, so sad. My heart aches for Billie and Todd, and the rest of their family. RIP Debbie, you & Carrie are together again. 💔

  16. robyn says:

    Debbie Reynolds … wow … what an icon! I got the impression she and her daughter, Carrie, were at odds for a long, long time and that it was an uneasy relationship until they came to terms with how deep and unconditional their mother/daughter love was. Carrie could not have been an easy child to watch through all her troubles and Debbie certainly had her own problems throughout the years. How can anyone live up to the amazing work ethic Debbie had and her many artistic talents? She was a petite workhorse. What an amazing history within this family survived through humor. It is not surprising that Carrie’s worst moment was the last straw and the end of her mother.

    My favorite Carrie quote: Celebrity is obscurity waiting to happen.

  17. Mia4S says:

    Heartbreaking….just…I can’t. All love and strength to the family.

  18. CornyBlue says:

    Though in its entirety is is very sad specially for Billy and Carrie’s brother, I feel like Debbie Reynolds is probably more at peace this way. No parent should have to bury their child. I have seen what it can do to parents and in a way i am glad she does not have to live through the grief.

  19. N. says:

    How can a family cope with a tragedy like this?
    My heart goes out to them, especially Debbie’s son and Carrie’s daughter Billie. Losing your mother and your grandmother in less than two days is beyond cruel.

  20. Shambles says:

    “Being normal is vastly overrated.”

    RIP Debbie. This is heartbreaking. What a year of loss.

    It reminds me much too much of the death of one of my close friends. I had just gotten out of high school, and he died the summer after graduation. He was the first person I ever knew to pass away. His mother had cancer, and she went three days later.

  21. Mel says:

    In a way I am glad that Debbie’s clearly incredible pain after losing her child at least didn’t last too long. She also won’t have to worry who’ll care after Carrie, which she mentioned as being one of her great fears. If there is an afterlife, they are together. All is well.
    I hope the family – what a terrible time for them – feels the same way and finds comfort in that.

  22. Miranda says:

    This is the kind of news that makes you immediately call your parents to tell them you love them. I’m still giving my puppies belly rubs after reading about poor Gary yesterday. How devastating for the family, especially Billie and Todd. I hope they have a lot of love and support to get through this, I can’t imagine what they must be feeling. A mother and grandmother/sister and mother passing at practically the same time. God.

  23. EMAu says:

    I’m still shocked. What a horrible thing, for a family to organise 2 funerals. My thoughts are with the family.

  24. Kri says:

    2016 just won’t stop.I am beginning to think we should all start paying very close attention. Although I am not surprised at this news,I’m veryou sad.Love is a powerful thing.Debbie wanted to be with her daughter and that’s what she did.This is awesome inspiring on many different levels.My thoughts are for Billie ,Todd and Gary. Peace.

  25. Nancy says:

    Carrie was married to Paul Simon who wrote Mother and Child Reunion:
    I would not give you false hope on this strange and mournful day; But the Mother and Child reunion is only a motion away…..

  26. Eric says:

    I’m still grieving George Michael, ffs. Bitter end of a year in what may be regarded as a cursed year in the future.
    Don’t even look at Dick Van Dyke 2016, or I will smack you with me ol bamboo!

  27. grabbyhands says:

    I’m going to miss you, Aggie Cromwell.

    Not that I’m excited about 2017, but god-I’d just like to crawl into bed and sleep until this year is over. Their poor family-I can’t even imagine what the grief they must be dealing with right now.

  28. Bethy says:

    I remember reading “Postcards From The Edge,” Carrie’s semi-autobiographical book when it first came out. It described her relationship with Debbie. So happy they were able to make up after years of estrangement. I can’t imagine the pain of Carrie’s brother and daughter losing them both within a day of each other. Prays for their whole family.

  29. Chantal says:

    It is so odd, I kind of knew in my gut she was going to die after Carrie died and it would before this year ends. She probably could not face the thought of burying her daughter who had been through so much. It overwhelmed her. So sad and painful.

  30. Miss M says:

    RIP, Debbie Reynolds! My love, thoughts and prayers are with their family and close friends.
    “Singing in the rain” is one of my favorite movies.

  31. Cee says:

    I actually cried when I heard the news; so much heartbreak for their family in such a short time. Grief is hard to deal with, especially when it’s a parent losing a child. My thoughts are with Todd and Billie, and any other member of their family.

    When my mum lost her mum at age 16, her grandfather died 2 months later. He couldn’t deal with his only child’s sudden death. To this day my mum believes he died of sadness and a broken heart.

  32. what's inside says:

    Debbie was a joy and a true Queen of Hollywood. She and Carrie have returned to the stars.

  33. boredblond says:

    She was the definition of ‘a class act’..a real rarity today. RIP, Mary Frances…

  34. Liz says:

    I know nothing about Billie’s father, but I really hope that he has the emotional substance to be able to help his daughter right now. She’s so young and even if she doesn’t think so, she needs love and support right now. Her uncle has enough to deal with – losing his mother and sister – she needs her father and her aunts.

  35. Giddy says:

    Debbie and Carrie were both so talented, clever, and treasured. We are all poorer for their loss. Drop that mirror ball and let’s get this steel-bellied bitch of a year done!

  36. ash says:

    i literally am tearing up as I write this….. and was crying when i was driving into work and NPR announced this news.

    Then snarky retorts, cynicism, funniness, and discussion of awkwardness that Carrie and Debbie is literally my relationship with my mom. We are incredible close yet had moments where I was I felt running away from her in my early 20′s and teens.

    What really got me was the affection, literally debbie adored carrie, even in an video interview she said I MOVED RIGHT NEXT DOOR TO BE WITH MY DAUGHTER, THAT WAY I CAN ALWAYS SEE HER, then Ms. Debbie kissed her on the lips (like a mom kissing her baby) and carrie said are you proud of me, to which debbie said of course and that she was amazing woman and so gifted (im paraphrasing)…..i lost my ish right there because that’s just adoration and love to the core and just liking someone. I think that’s what gets me, Debbie really not only loved her daughter but liked her as well.

    Now let me do to the restroom and clear my eyes, :(

  37. IlsaLund says:

    My prayers go out to their family and I pray for their comfort and strength during this incredibly difficult time. One can truly die of a broken heart. R.I.P.

  38. teacakes says:

    She was a grand old lady, may she rest in peace. I hope she and Carrie are together in heaven like she wanted.

    I also really hope her granddaughter and surviving son have the support they need to get through this, I can’t even imagine what it’s like, losing two family members within a day of each other.

  39. Hazel says:

    I always loved Debbie Reynolds–Singing in the Rain is one of my all-time favorites. And she had such spunk! She was the unsinkable one! Such a sad time for their family.

  40. Eric says:

    As much as 2016 sucks, 1999 wasn’t that much better for celeb deaths.

  41. Lori says:

    Thank you, thank you, thank you for posting that Oprah interview with Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher. Two truly remarkable lives and they will both be missed.

  42. MellyMel says:

    This is so heartbreaking. I can’t even fathom what Billie & Todd are feeling right now. My thoughts are with them and their families.

  43. minx says:

    I think Carrie got her resiliency from her mother. Debbie got dumped by her first husband and cheated by her second, and she just had to keep going. Billie will need that quality now, too.

  44. Veronica says:

    I was just thinking yesterday how hard it must be to outlive your own children. This one hit my mother hard – she grew up watching Reynolds and Fisher. She and her mother are the same age as these two at their passing.

    My heart goes out to the whole family. I can’t imagine how devastating it must be to plan two funerals back to back.

  45. hmmm says:

    I think her dying was a kindness. I loved her in “The Unsinkable Molly Brown”. Awesome, just awesome.

  46. Cerys says:

    Singing in the Rain has always been one of my favourite films. Such a sad thing to happen. My sympathies to Todd Fisher and his family.

  47. Josefina says:

    All hugs and good wishes to this poor family. Stay strong!

  48. Lisa says:

    This is heartbreaking for their family. But I wasn’t surprised when I heard about Debbie, and I knew she would follow.

    It still hurts to know that they’re gone. I’m just thankful for the legacy of laughter and education that they leave behind. There will never be another duo like them. They’re both inspirational women. I feel fortunate to have walked the earth at the same time as they did.

  49. VegasSchmagus says:

    Here’s a video of Debbie and Carrie singing together on Oprah – so sweet…….you can see how proud Debbie is of Carrie………….

    http://www.oprah.com/oprahshow/debbie-reynolds-and-carrie-fisher-perform-video

  50. NC says:

    Both led glamorous yet tragic lives. Both suffered a lot alone and with each other.

    From my understanding Carrie took care of her mother when they reconciled more than Debbie took care of her. I really think Debbie loved Carrie so much for that.

    I hope in spite of their tough lives that they are now at peace and with each other wherever they are right now. Singing and laughing and maybe kidding Eddie about the size of his little wee wee.

    RIP the both of you. You both earned it.

  51. paddyjr says:

    Thank you for including the Oprah interview. It is obvious how much Carrie and Debbie loved each other and how proud Debbie was of Carrie, not just for her professional success but for dealing with her illness. I appreciate them being so candid about how difficult the parent-child relationship can be; in their case probably more difficult because they are so similar: wicked sense of humor and amazing strength of character (both got knocked down by life, picked themselves up, dusted themselves off and found ways to succeed). I was in tears during the whole piece, especially when Debbie said one of the best quotes I have ever heard about parenting: “I have worked through a lot of tears, but Carrie is worth it.”

    My heartbreaks for their family and friends, especially Billie, Todd, Trisha, Joely and Gary. May they find peace and happiness in the new year. On a purely selfish note, I am sad we will not see more of Princess (now General) Leia in the new Star Wars movies; I hope they send her off in a suitable way. RIP Debbie and Carrie. You will be missed, but I’m happy you’re together again.

  52. Jayna says:

    I remember reading all about Debbie’s second husband, Harry Karl, a multi-millionaire, who ultimately lost all his money and hers and left her owing money. But I never knew anything about her third husband. He met her at a vulnerable time, in her early 50s and lonely, divorced for years from Harry, and now ready to share her life with someone. But her third husband turned out to be truly evil.

    http://nypost.com/2013/03/31/third-times-the-harm/

    • Christin says:

      No wonder she once said she managed to marry ‘idiots’. Sad that she spent her 60s-70s trying to unravel the financial mess.

      I think it’s in the 2011 interview linked here where she mentions not wanting to have to work as much. She was working 42 weeks a year then (at 78 or 79 years of age).

      Update — Idiot 3 is still alive and has already done an interview with DM, complete with many photos. He mentions his side is or will be told in his book. Cashing in already!

      • Jayna says:

        How disgusting. He should be in jail, not cashing in. No one should buy his story in a rag mag or entertainment interview or book. He’s a vile human being. But DailyMail has no conscious anyway, so I’m not surprised.

        Yeah, in the 2011 interview she was selling all the memorabilia she had invested in. That is what saved her after the divorce from this creep. Her investment in all the movie costumes, clothes, etc, was really smart on her part. The first auction grossed about 22 million or more. She had two more smaller auctions after that I think I read. It gave her back her financial security for when she retired.

  53. vava says:

    died of a broken heart. Stress, grief – especially in the elderly. I’ve seen this happen more times than I care to think about.

    Her family must be reeling right now.

    • Christin says:

      I have seen it, too, and it’s sad because of feeling helpless to fill the void of their broken heart.

      The other day, I looked up cast members of a 1960s sitcom, just to see if any were still around. One of the older cast members was a character actress who died years ago in her late 60s. What I did not know is that her younger husband (mid-50s) had a massive heart attack and passed the day of her funeral. Now this happens — a loved one passes the next day.

  54. 5thHouse says:

    Wasn’t Debbie on an episode of The Golden Girls?

  55. A says:

    I am absolutely gutted by this. I love Debbie Reynolds. I love Carrie Fisher. I’ve watched Singing in the Rain more times than I can count, and I’ve always been so impressed with Debbie Reynolds’ collection of Hollywood memorbilia (she has like…three out of who knows how many of the existing pairs of the red shoes from Wizard of Oz I think?) I still remember reading about her debut in Singing in the Rain and how Gene Kelly would disparage her dancing skills, to the point where after one rehearsal, Fred Astaire found her curled up under a piano in the studio, crying, and offered to help her practice for it. They shot the whole Good Morning number in one take, and afterwards, she found blood in her shoes from all the blisters that she’d gotten from doing the choreography.

    I’m honestly so worried about Billie Lourde. It’s got to be unspeakably devastating for her, and I hope she’s coping okay. Losing your mom is one thing, but losing your mom and grandma within days of each other, so unexpectedly, is another. I really hope she’s doing okay and I wish her all the best.

  56. babyb says:

    i lost my mum and grandma this year too. I feel so angry and helpless… for the ones left behind we’re in the most awful position…
    rest in peace Debbie and Carrie…