Cameron Diaz: ‘I’d rather see my face aging than a face that doesn’t belong to me’

Cameron Diaz

Cameron Diaz has gone on the talk show circuit to promote her first publishing venture, The Body Book. As always, Cam is nothing if not animated. I appreciate that brand of enthusiasm as opposed to certain bored starlets (I won’t name names) who can’t be bothered to promote their work. I think Cameron would probably drive me nuts in real life because everything is so amazing to her, but she makes for a highly entertaining interview.

Cameron has already shared excerpts about her book’s stance on pubic hair, adult acne, and promoting longevity over thinness. Now she’s talking about all sorts of stuff with GMA, Entertainment Tonight, and USA Today. I’ve pieced together some excerpts. There is one part where I think she’s completely full of crap, but you be the judge:

She sounds like a cool cook: “I’m always looking for new ways to build flavor and have fun with my carbs. For instance, I prefer savory over sweet, so in the mornings when I make oatmeal, instead of eating it with something sweet, I make a yummy concoction of sauteed zucchini with collard greens, caramelized shallots, and egg whites. I top it all off with ponzu sauce (a Japanese sauce made from rice vinegar and citrus) or some lemon juice. It’s a breakfast that is delicious and savory and all the things that I love to taste. I created this dish so that I could eat oatmeal in the morning, because it is an awesome source of complex carbohydrates.”

She’s natural? “I’ve tried [Botox] before, where it was like [a] little tiny touch of something. It changed my face in such a weird way that I was like, ‘No, I don’t want to [be] like [that]. I’d rather see my face aging than a face that doesn’t belong to me at all.”

On wrinkles: “I love [them,] I don’t mind. It’s like, ‘Guess what this means, I’ve smiled my whole life.’ I love life. I’m happy I don’t have a problem with that.”

She started exercise in her late 20s: “It felt amazing. I watched my body transform over a week of intense training — some days doing upward of 1,500 to 2,000 kicks a day. Kicking, kicking, kicking for eight hours. All of a sudden I had six-pack abs. It was painful. I would not recommend that anyone blast their body like that. It was an intense, physical challenge. But it woke me up to my own body and what it was capable of.”

She still works out: “I went to the gym this morning. I did cardio. I went on the elliptical for half an hour. Sometimes I do the treadmill. I do a mile as fast as I can go. … I don’t like to run too long because it can have an impact on my knees or joints. I’m more of a sprinter.” Part of the motivation for eating healthy and exercising regularly is thinking ahead to “my longevity,” she says. “I want to make sure I don’t get sick. If I’m blessed to get older, I want to make sure I can maintain quality of life.”

Staying active: Movement can be done all of the time, and it should be:
* Do butt squeezes while you’re brushing your teeth.
* Do lunges while you’re waiting for the coffee to brew.
* Do calf raises while you’re waiting for the train.
* Run up the stairs. Run down the stairs.
* Stretch your calves on the stairs.
* Walk to the next bus stop. Or the next.
* Do sit-ups while dinner is in the oven.
* Stretch during the commercial breaks

[From USA Today, ABC News, and [From Entertainment Tonight]

I won’t get into the popular misconception that running hurts your knees and joints because that argument is pointless. Some people will always believe it, and others … won’t. Cameron’s exercise tips are amusing though. She’s doing a good job of appealing to people who don’t have the time or desire for expensive fitness trainers who will insult you as “motivation.” I wonder if she really squeezes her booty while brushing her teeth.

On the whole “Botox” issue, I think Cameron’s glossing over the fact that she’s had more permanent work done. Her face has changed over the years (and it’s more than mere aging), but admitting it kind of goes against the happy-go-lucky theme of her book.

Cameron Diaz

Cameron Diaz

Photos courtesy of WENN

 

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82 Responses to “Cameron Diaz: ‘I’d rather see my face aging than a face that doesn’t belong to me’”

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  1. don't kill me i'm french says:

    she looks good and she doesn’t fake her love of sport exercise

  2. GMarchetti says:

    Cammy, please! Nice try, you’re not aging well and now you keep saying that you’re OK with it…

  3. MelissaMelissa says:

    I like Cameron Diaz and I understand when any female celebrity discuss health/beauty topics, it’s meant to be empowering, but those conversations always annoy me for some reason. I’m no expert, but I think Cameron has had some work done or she’s not aging very well.

    • Meredith says:

      Just take a look at her in “Night and Day” with Tom Cruise. Her face looked kinda funny as if it had had work done. I like her movies and she seems like a fun person to be with but it’s not like she’s just had a tiny bit of botox IMO. Still I will definitely be seeing her movie “The Other Woman”.

  4. Dawn says:

    I think she looks great! But I would say that once she is in her 50′s if not before she will do a little something to her face, I hope not but I think she will. As for her body, it is bangin!

    • Tazina says:

      I could care less if she had implants. That’s her deal. I don’t think she’s had anything done to her face. She’s aging a little faster due to loving the sun and hanging out at the beach. She’ll probably cave eventually and get something done.

      Running is bad for the knees and ankles, maybe not for all but for some. It gets you in later life, not when you’re young. The damage is cumulative.

  5. kibbles says:

    I remember seeing Cameron in The Mask and thought she was stunning. Of course, she was only 21 at the time so I don’t expect her to look the same as she did 20 years ago, but I think she went overboard with the exercising. She looked great when she had some curves and some natural fat on her face. Maybe if she had not slimmed down so much over the years she wouldn’t have felt the need to get Botox to plump up her face. I remember photos of her from just a year ago at Paris Fashion Week and her face looked awful after what looked like Botox or a chemical peel? Something that made her skin and face look awful. I can see someone like Cate Blanchett writing a beauty book because she has lived a healthy life and it shows in her face and skin. Smoking, drinking, sunbathing, and Botox have done a lot of damage to Cameron’s face. Her book would be worth reading if Cameron admits to these habits and how it has done a number to her face as she ages.

  6. Helvetica says:

    I love her. And I love what she said about her wrinkles meaning she has been smiling all her life. She is great.

  7. MSat says:

    I have never thought Cam’s face was attractive, but her body is fantastic. I have a soft spot for her, though – she’s Fiona from “Shrek,” my kids’ fave movie when they were little!

  8. Renee says:

    Yes, it is obvious that her face has changed. But she can still move her forehead muscles which is more than can be said of a lot of folks in the business.

    As for the running, whenever I’ve run I’ve ended up with knee and ankle pain. I would usually run on asphalt instead of concrete and would run really slowly but it didn’t matter much. I am sure that I don’t have the best form when running but I also have a body that is suited to that kind of physical activity; my back is curved I have knock knees and weak ankles. I get better results from dancing and aerobics. I am surprised at Cameron though, her body seems like it would be able to handle it (she is not heavy and has straight legs).

  9. GeeMoney says:

    I’ve always liked Cameron Diaz, and I love the fact that she actually works out (which is evident, you can see the muscle on her figure). She hasn’t aged well due to loving being out in the sun on her surfboard, but I can’t fault her for that… I love being outdoors too.

    I hope she sticks to what she says about not changing her face… I wish more celebrities would rebel against the crazy doctors and studio heads out there in H-town that tell them that they need to cut their face up in order to keep working. In my opinion, having a wrinkly, natural face is better than having a stretched out, unrecognizable one.

  10. Lisa says:

    I also like her. She also seems genuinely into sports and having fun. Aging in Hollywood is a bitch, and she seems more real than most.

  11. LAK says:

    Surprised she’s not talking about her nosejob.

    Not that she should, but in the past she’s been vocal about it – something about it being broken due to sport (eye roll)

    And now, all she’s done is alittle botox??!!

    • bluecalling says:

      she really did eff up her nose. She needed to get it fixed. Just looking at it (and livibg with someone who broke their nose and never fixed it) made me wonder if she ever got a good night’s sleep. I buy she has had no work done but does facials to keep fresh.

    • Violet says:

      Plus she also got breast implants a few years back. (Probably ARod’s influence, since Kate Hudson also got a set of bolt-ons after getting involved with him.)

      Fake boobs aside, I think she has a great body. But her face is not aging well at all. If I didn’t know how old Cameron was, I’d guess she was already in her 50s.

  12. Lisa says:

    Haha, sit-ups. What a dumbass…

  13. Talie says:

    I’ll say this, she had a rather natural face in The Counselor and I think it really added to the character — gave her depth. Say what you will about the film, I thought she was amazing in it.

  14. Lflips says:

    I suppose only time will tell if she really means what she says.

  15. Happy21 says:

    Blah blah blah mumble, mumble, mumble…By now celebs talking about their ‘natural’ faces just sound like the adults from the Peanuts cartoons to me…

  16. P.J. says:

    Says someone with one of the most comically worked on faces in Hollywood 😒 (The cheeks alone!)

  17. P.J. says:

    Hmm. “the popular misconception that running hurts your knees and joints…” Countless studies, physical therapists doctors and their patients are all wrong? Sure, running can be VERY healthy. But not always and not for everyone.

    Do all runners find themselves with bad ankles, bum knees and deteriorating hips as a result? Of course not! But plenty of people do and it’s not all mere coincidence. I’m only 30 and several of my girlfriends who have been daily long distance runners since high school are already starting to suffer from major joint problems and are in PT. We’re 30! I’m kind of surprised that Bedhead would make such a sort of close minded, dismissive statement about this complex issue. (It doesn’t have to become a “debate” at all though. Some people’s bodies suffer from running and others don’t. There you have it.) I know that she herself loves to run but…Idk. I guess I’m just feeling a little defensive for my friends who are in pain :(

    • T.C. says:

      Running hurts my knees and ankles too if I do too much of it.

    • BlueDacnis says:

      Yeah, I worked in a running store for about a year and the majority of the long-term (20+ years) runners had knee problems at the very least, to the point of having to wear light knee braces 24/7 and heavy ones for running. Some of it can be avoided with the correct shoes and, for most people, some sort of orthotic insert to correct pronation, but the force on your knees takes its toll year on year. Scared me off of running, honestly. Much more comfortable with the elliptical now.
      I wasn’t aware that this was considered a misconception. Even in the running store, which obviously wanted to promote running as much as possible, it was an issue not of whether but of how much knee/hip damage you’d suffer and the focus was on trying to limit the damage through, though I don’t think we would ever have said it as frankly as all that!

    • TheOriginalKitten says:

      I think Bedhead’s point is that much like almost anything diet or exercise-related, if you search online, you will find different studies to support different theories, with no definitive or clear final answer.

      “The idea that running causes osteoarthritis has been studied. In July 2013, “Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise” published a study that followed 14,000 runners and nearly 70,000 walkers during a seven-year period to see if the runners had a higher incidence of osteoarthritis. The results turned out negative. In fact, runners had a lower incidence of both osteoarthritis and hip replacements than habitual walkers of the same demographics. The authors attributed this in part to the lower body mass index of runners compared to those who participated in other exercises.”

      I think this link succinctly sums up the diverging opinions on the subject:

      http://www.livestrong.com/article/367467-long-term-effects-of-running-on-the-joints/

      As a runner myself, I can tell you that it’s not a form of exercise that I recommend to people. It can be painful at times, but to me, that’s just an inevitable reality of the sport. It’s not a day at the spa, you know?
      You’re breaking down muscle tissue in an extremely harsh way-it’s not gonna feel good.

      • LadySlippers says:

        Read ‘Born to Run’. Apparently when most of us get injured walking or running it’s due to bad form. And horrible footwear.

        Great book too — even for a lazy bum like me! Lol (I seriously mean the book is GOOD. It’s easy to read and very entertaining).

      • TheOriginalKitten says:

        Hey Ladyslippers :)
        Thanks for the recommendation! Oddly enough, I was just thinking about how I need to pick up some new books…

      • emmie_a says:

        LadySlippers: I second everything you said… ‘Born to Run’ IS a great read! And omg — getting professionally fitted for running shoes makes a HUGE difference. Finding the right gym shoes actually corrected a lot of my form issues.

        I’m a new runner (training for a 1/2 marathon) and I’ve read a lot about knee issues because I am a power walker and have mild arthritis in my knees and bursitis in one hip (shouldn’t be running!!!) — and so far core training and light weights have done wonders for my joints.

    • Cazzee says:

      I think a lot of it has to do with the degree of running that a person does. Light running, if begun slowly, should actually strengthen your knees.

      However, my sister’s husband is an orthopedic surgeon and he sees the true running addicts – the 1% of the population who are addicted to the runner’s high. These people do indeed run all of cartilage out of their knees, and they will keep on running even though it is incredibly painful (!). Then they show up in my brother-in-law’s office and eventually have to get knee replacements.

    • Bitca says:

      Yep; Bedhead, love ya, but that “common misconception” remark about running is perhaps misworded?

      Messed up my achilles tendon in 2 years of high-impact of aerobics–by age 20 (they called it ‘shin splints’ back then). By 30, the tendon situation made it painful simply to walk at times. Despite my being on or under the lowest part of the height/weight scale til I was about 45. There are all sorts of factors involved (trainer shoes, warm-up/cooldowns I guess, &c), but really, any sort of high-impact cardio can cause sport injuries.

    • phlyfiremama says:

      Exactly. That statement carelessly thrown off like that could make women feel like it is “only in their head” that they are having pain from running, and cause them to continue to do so until irreparable harm has been done to the joints. I used to skate outdoors in downtown Houston~all over the city, we would skate 20 miles in a night. I had some foot issues due to bunions, but otherwise was healthy. When I went active duty in the Army, the non-stop physical training truly damaged my body~to the point that 16 years later after getting out on a medical I STILL have hip, knee, & back problems so severe that I can’t stand up for too long, I can’t sit still for too long, and I can’t lay on my back or stomach (for more than about 40 minutes max on my back, not at all on my stomach). This was a direct result of running, and being forced to continue even though I was clearly injured.

      • phlyfiremama says:

        Which, BTW, has only been helped by Acupuncture & Chinese herbs~which is what I now do for a living. “I’m not just the hair club president…”

      • Danskins says:

        Lol @ hair club for men reference! :)

        I also enjoy running occasionally but can’t do it too often without it causing back pain due to my large chest (I’m a 42 DDD).

        For years I’ve wanted a breast reduction but eventually learned to accept myself as is and wear two sports bras in the meantime when working out. And thank goodness for ellipticals!

    • Sumodo1 says:

      I am disabled from years of sports and Lyme Disease. The impact of skiing moguls, running 10k races, playing softball (Catcher), rowing crew, competing in equine events, and even cycling have done me in. Two bum knees, a bad right hip with bursitis, a painful arthritic back with spasms, and hands that are numb–and of course, other Lyme problems, have me disabled before age 60. I was in TV. Sports are great: so is the pain you have to treat. Aging is a bitch.

    • lucy2 says:

      Running or anything with impact messes up my lower back and hips, but I’m sure I have terrible form, and just don’t have a body type well suited to it.

    • glaugh says:

      I gave that statement a side eye as well. My hubs is a physiotherapist (and a well researched runner) who has provided physio to countless marathoners/athletes and he fully believes running is hard on your joints and developing problems is almost inevitable if you do it too regularly for too long. He likes barefoot running and uses ‘minimalist’ shoes, which he believes helps improve running form and minimize damage.

      I also have to say “Born to Run” is an excellent read!

  18. Naye in VA says:

    She doesnt look like she’s had any work done at all. She admitted to trying it. I really think the change in her face is accelerated aging due to sun damage. Her cheekbones lips and brow bone are all the same, if not more pronounced due to her thinness, much like Angelina Jolie. She really wears all of her wrinkles. If she had anything done, I can’t tell. But i guess it’s a rule of thumb to assume all celebrities have.

  19. phlyfiremama says:

    Actually, running is particularly rough on women~since we tend to carry our weight mostly in our hips, butt & thighs, that lower center of gravity causes more stress on those areas, and radiates down towards the knees and feet. Men are centered more in their chest, and so less impact around the lower parts means fewer problems for them. Swimming is the best all around exercise, since it works out every muscle group without injury and works for cardiovascular efficency as well.

  20. TheOriginalKitten says:

    Ah well I tried, Bedhead ;)

  21. mar says:

    she looks good and I like what she is saying. She does not want to be Kim K. whose face is now a different person.

  22. Ginger says:

    Hasn’t she admitted in the past to having two nose jobs? No mention of that from her here that I’ve seen.

  23. Stephanie says:

    If I had a face and body like Cam’s, I would age naturally too.

  24. Kim1 says:

    She has had nose jobs and has discussed them in the book .She also talks about breaking her nose several times, last time while surfing.

  25. Finn says:

    Maybe stick to gossip and not medical advice. Tuning on asphalt or for long periods, particularly when overweight or with pre-existing knee/ankle problems can be very damaging for joints.

  26. Mrs. Ari Gold says:

    When you age naturally your face starts to look like it doesn’t belong to you either.

    That’s why people get cosmetic surgery!

    • Sugar says:

      Thats awesome! I am like Cameron in that I stayed youthful looking through my adult life (my genes) and I have always been super active- its all good except for that aging thing-WTH?
      This I will say that up until my 50′s my skin hadn’t changed much now @ 52 its all about the moisturizer,h20 & less sun -the damage is done-but I’m trying to not make it worse as Im very outdoor oriented.

  27. lucy2 says:

    I saw the clip where she was talking about smiling her whole life, and I kind of liked that. But holy moly, either the color on my screen was off or she had on the wrong shade of makeup, she looked very orange.
    I don’t know that I’d read her book, but I like that she’s approaching it from health over vanity, and has practical things to eat and do. Very anti-Goop, from what it sounds like.

  28. RHONYC says:

    great idea with her oatmeal. i just bought some the other day & LOVE kale so i’ll mix ‘em together next time with some eggwhites. :mrgreen: better than the processed sh*t i’ve been eating from Dunkin Donuts most mornings & thriftier too.

  29. Ravensdaughter says:

    If you a have a certain form of hereditary osteoporosis that is inflammatory, running (a HIGH impact exercise) WILL tear up your hips, especially. My MD has 2 hip replacements on one side, and one on the other. Unfortunately, the second HR was one of the new fangled titanium joints-despite my MD doing all his research pre-surgery-it failed. You get wear and tear which results in titanium shards in the joint and an immune response that is detrimental to the joint. This is a design defect that thousands of patients with this titanium joint are having to address. So he has to have another hip replacement. Btw, my MD is 53 years old.
    This information is all via my MD, processed through my previous training as an RN (now retired). I DO NOT consider myself an authority on Sports Medicine/Orthopedics.

    Bedhead: “I won’t get into the popular misconception that running hurts your knees and joints because that argument is pointless”, bothers me, because you imply that you are an authority-how so? Nothing is worse than medical misinformation, this area of medicine being one of the trickier ones: the information base and recommendations keep expanding and changing. EVERY patient should check with their MD prior to undertaking a new exercise regime, because every individual has unique (potential) health problems….
    Here you go-read this article from “Internal Medicine News”
    http://www.internalmedicinenews.com/single-view/recognizing-and-treating-inflammatory-subtype-of-osteoarthritis/a98304bcf8ce668159296a3a1d426ae3.html
    This is the hand variety; in hips, too…

    • Ravensdaughter says:

      Sorry, that was a hand article-pretty obscure. Below is actually more direct to BH’s statement as it relates to knee joint damage with high-aerobic exercise. In any case, there is a risk of osteoarthritis-more so in women. Remember, women lose bone mass after menopause.
      http://xnet.kp.org/permanentejournal/Fall00/Osteoarthritis.html
      [I found this with a simple Google search-"osteoarthritis and runners"]
      I think this is legitimate issue to assess initially-especially in women approaching menopause- part of Diaz’s readership-and periodically as the woman (or man) ages.

  30. Jackie Jormp Jomp (formerly Zelda) says:

    Yeah, ok. You take the bus, Cameron Diaz. I buy it.

  31. 313girl says:

    The girl has big personality and I appreciate that. She doesn’t give boring & staged interviews & seems to breathe life into a room. There is something to be said for personality which is much more important than whether someone has had work done to their face.

  32. Dinah says:

    Firstly, I think the generalization about running being bad for knees isn’t all bunk. For those of us who are predestined to have patellar cartilage problems, the increased grinding is a deal breaker. It has to do with the angle from the crest of the hip to the patella ( kneecap) to the tibia. In many women it is abnormal- and stress on the inside of the kneecap is worsened by quadriceps muscle imbalance. We often don’t learn the cause of the pain until the damage is done, and it’s a little late for a fix ( strengthening quads) unless you surgically change the tracking of the patella (through entire flexion & extension). I was told several years ago that I even had to give up the sustained flexed poses of yoga if I wanted to be walking in my 50s and 60s. Sucks. Here’s a short blurb: http://sportsmedicine.about.com/od/women/a/Q_angle.htm

    Secondly, regarding her exercise pattern- my hubby does this- squeezes small sets in whenever he can (used to embarrass kids by doing it in public, they’re used to it now). He’s 52 and lean and fit. He feels good about it because he rarely has time to go to an actual gym. Works for him, but they probably both have naturally lean body types/ fast running metabolic furnaces (runs even hotter with the exercise).

  33. JenniferJustice says:

    She seriously thinks we don’t know she’s had work done to her face? It was just last year (2013) that she looked horrible from too much botox, lip injections, and whatever else she had done. Stop lying and get off the soap box!

  34. Flower says:

    It’s too late to age naturally for her , all the accumulated little tweeks she’s had done over the past 20 years are showing (badly). You can not disguise that plastic surgery frog mouth and it will just look worse as she ages.

  35. Alison says:

    PERFECTLY said…same goes with what she has to say about bald vaginas…I like her a lot more now

  36. Dorothy says:

    Oh Cameron, so loved until she hooked up with Gwyneth. Now the lies, phoniness and preaching to us plebs is latching onto her! Terrible! She was so wonderful and liked when buddies with Drew. Now, her popularity is declining very quickly due to the Gwyneth factor. Come on Cam, ditch GOOP, and go back to your sweet self – not that twit you are now. Goop just started using you couple years ago when planning LA move – she’ll stab you in the back and/or ruin you unless you catch on like the smart ones do. Really hope she gets it together – it’s sad really.