Amy Winehouse died alone, in bed, allegedly after an “lethal” overdose

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There are twenty-bajillion stories about the death of Amy Winehouse, so please, bear with us. I was tempted to wait until an autopsy had been done and the results released before discussing what Amy could have possibly been on, if her death was the result of an overdose or alcohol poisoning. But… there are so many reports about what she was doing during her final day, so… let’s just talk about it. British sources say that Amy was on a terrible bender involving heroin, ecstasy, ketamine and excessive quantities of alcohol:

A source told The People that she was seen buying substances, believed to be cocaine, heroin, ecstasy and ketamine leading up to the hours before her death. She is also thought to have been drinking heavily, which may have been the trigger of a lethal concoction of drugs and alcohol.

The source told the newspaper: ‘Amy seemed determined to have a big one on Friday night. She was out in Camden on Friday evening, but seemed determined to carry on the party back at her flat. None of us know who was with her into the early hours of Saturday. But getting out of it was clearly her main priority of the night.’

Another source from one Camden pub told the tabloid that they had also seen Amy buying cocaine from a well known dealer in the area.

Meanwhile, friends of the star told the Sunday Mirror that they believe she died from a ‘bad’ ecstasy pill mixed with a large amount of alcohol.

Winehouse also suffered from emphysema, which is a disease of the lungs that causes shortness of breath.

One friend told the newspaper: ‘It was an ecstasy overdose. She could do cocaine until the cows come home. But this was obviously a dodgy pill.’

[From The Mail]

Meanwhile, the autopsy has still not been completed, and Scotland Yard wants everyone to chill out. They released a statement which says in part: “At this early stage it is being treated as unexplained and there have been no arrests in connection with the incident.” However, TMZ’s source says that the Yard is operating under the suspicion that Amy overdosed.

Amy was discovered in her Camden apartment by her security guard. Amy’s rep tells media outlets, “She was in her bedroom after saying she wanted to sleep, and when he went to wake her he found she wasn’t breathing. [The bodyguard] called the emergency services straight away. He was very shocked. At this stage no one knows how she died. She died alone in bed.”

Amy’s parents Mitch and Janis have released a statement to the media as well: “Our family has been left bereft by the loss of Amy, a wonderful daughter, sister, niece. She leaves a gaping hole in our lives. We are coming together to remember her and we would appreciate some privacy and space at this terrible time.” Mitch was in NYC when Amy died, and he flew into England right away to be with his family. Janis, who had seen Amy just 24 hours before her death, reportedly said that she felt Amy’s death was “only a matter of time”: “She seemed out of it. But her passing so suddenly still hasn’t hit me.” Janis says that Amy’s last words to her were “I love you, mum” and Janis says, “They are the words I will always treasure. I’m glad I saw her when I did.”

Amy’s ex-husband Blake Civil-Fielder is still in prison, and it’s being said that he’s been put on suicide watch because they’re afraid of what he might do in the wake of Amy’s death. Blake even released a statement! “I’m beyond inconsolable … my tears won’t dry. I will never ever again feel the love I felt for her. Everybody who knew me and knew Amy knew the depth of our love. I can’t believe she’s dead.” Meanwhile, Amy’s last boyfriend, Reg Traviss, has not released any statements.

Lastly, every celebrity is talking about Amy, releasing statements or tweeting about it. My favorite eulogy was from Russell Brand – he wrote a surprisingly lovely, touching, compassionate and intelligent eulogy/essay for Amy in the form on a long blog post. If you’d like to read it, go here.

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Photos courtesy of Fame.

 

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63 Responses to “Amy Winehouse died alone, in bed, allegedly after an “lethal” overdose”

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  1. the original bellaluna says:

    I hope she’s found the peace she couldn’t find in life. Poor thing, to die alone in bed.

  2. Helen says:

    She’s been alone all her life, and died alone too. I know she had issues, but it’s a shame her talent is gone. A wonderful artist, a terrible self-destroying personality. She will be missed :(

  3. Addie says:

    A real loss.

    One of the last truely talented artists with the ability to write unique and meaningful music in a sea of throw away meaningless rubbish.

    Glad that we have her music to remeber her by.

  4. *Roxy* says:

    I knew she’d join 27
    Such a loss((( R.I.P.

  5. constance says:

    I agree. It is a shame that her talent is gone. It’s a shame she didn’t take her well-being seriously and listen to the people trying to teach her to help herself. In the world of enablers and “yes men,” sometimes you really wish they would see what they are doing to a person. Mixing multiple types of drugs on any given night isn’t a “good time”- it’s roulette.

    I’m glad I met my husband, and he helped me turn my addictions around when I wasn’t trying hard enough. Too bad she didn’t find people she truly cared for and trusted who actually cared about her.

  6. May says:

    I’m so sorry that she died alone. Such a talent. So sad that she died

  7. Nah, nah & nah... says:

    Anybody else notice that Amy was born the same year that crack was introduced as a street drug? We’re in a whole new era of addiction, people. So sad she had to be the one to drive this fact home to the world.

    I will play “Frank” forever, in much the same way my dad still listens to “Pearl.” She will be sorely missed in the world of music and music fandom.

  8. Ghostwriter says:

    Russell Brand’s blog was moving as he eloquently described the tragedy of Amy Winehouse and others lost in addiction. Hopefully, it was a tribute that will move people to action – to help those with this disease rather than to just sit in judgment. I have a new found respect for Mr. Brand and a deep appreciation for his voice and honest expression of his personal struggles.

  9. Lizzy says:

    What her mom said, I can completely understand it cause Amy had been battling addiction(s) for years and it seemed that nothing could get her out of it.. still her death is incredibly sad for her family, her friends and her fans. Her voice was so unique, such a terrible waste. May she rest in peace.

  10. embertine says:

    Very sad. I was moved by Russell’s blog entry; I remember getting the phone call about my brother as if it has just happened. You can tell he’s experienced addiction himself.

  11. foozy says:

    i am beyond shocked! we will never hear a voice like hers again! what a loss..

  12. mln76 says:

    I’ve been listening to ‘Tears Dry On their Own’ on repeat all weekend. I loved Russell’s post. But It’s not surprising because he wrote an amazing memoir about his own struggles with addiction.

  13. Gossip Owl says:

    Russell Brand’s blog was amazing. He’s right though, we need to change how we view addiction. Less lives will be lost if we begin treating it like the disease it is and ditch the 12 steps model.

  14. sapphire says:

    Such a terrible, tragic waste of a unique talent.

  15. mags says:

    russell brand’s eulogy was beautifully written and brought me close to tears. he put into words what i couldn’t express myself

  16. Launicaangelina says:

    Heartbreaking…

  17. Miss Marie says:

    93 innocent people died in Norway by a crazed gunmen. Amy’s death pushed that story off that front page. What is wrong with that picture?

  18. Abby says:

    @ 17 Norway was the front page story on every paper I saw over the weekend. Both are sad stories. I feel sad at this loss to the music world, but it’s not a surprise. I never understood how she kept going and people like Michael Jackson and Heath Ledger died seemingly suddenly. Now life caught up with her, and I’m sad for wondering that in the past.

  19. rtms says:

    What’s even worse is that scumbag Blake may inherit all her wealth, which is est at 36 million pounds!

  20. Nanea says:

    When will people stop indiscriminately criminalizing the addicts?

    It’s the providers and enablers that are the real perps here.

    Thanks for linking to Russell’s blog post.

    Edited to add: I don’t know where you live, @ # 17 – Miss Marie, but in my part of the world the Norway massacre is the much bigger story in all news outlets and will remain so for days to come.

    There’s nothing wrong with featuring Amy on a gossip site though, or is there???

  21. The Original Ashley says:

    @ rtms they’ve been divorced for a while now. Unless she wrote him into her will (unlikely she planned ahead), he won’t be getting a dime.

    Although if he did he’d probably put it all up his nose and die of an overdose too. Despite him being a bad influence on her, I will say they had a Sid & Nancy type relationship. It seems likely that he’ll do something to himself.

    I’ve had Amy songs in my head all weekend, but I can’t bring myself to listen to her right now. It’s just to depressing to know we’ll never hear her again or see her walking around Camden.

  22. ladybert62 says:

    Doing the amount of drugs and alcohol that Ms. Winehouse did and then combining them is nothing more than russian roulette and eventually the player’s luck runs out and the player loses.

    Wonder if Ms. Lohan is paying any attention to this story since she also loves the russian roulette game of drugs and alcohol.

  23. Hakura says:

    I loved Amy’s voice, but had never pursued being a fan… & even I felt strangely emotionally ‘struck’ by her death. =( If love & well wishes can help her, wherever she is… Then she’s definitely got it.

    Sort of makes me think about how people reacted to Anna Nicole’s sudden death.

    God, Lindsay, pull your head out of your ass. =( Much as this girl disgusts me, I know I would be personally touched by it, incredibly sad to hear that she lost her life to such a waste as Alcohol/drugs.

  24. guilty pleasures says:

    @gossip owl,
    It would be a great step forward to recognize addictions as the disease they are, but to say we should ditch the 12 steps is wrongheaded. You are obviously not schooled in the reason for the 12 steps, or the benefit anyone can derive from doing them. I have recently learned that they are borrowed heavily from the Jewish religion, which has peaked my interest in Judaism.
    Russell Brand, whom I have always adored, is an addict in recovery. He is a proponent of a certain program which relies heavily on the the 12 steps of recovery, but one of the traditions is that one remains ‘anonymous at the level of press, radio and television (paraphrased).’
    The program also recognizes the need for outside help where required, for those who need more than the fellowship and the steps.
    God Bless Ms Winehouse, and all of those still suffering.

  25. Christine says:

    I love Amy and her music. This one is hitting me hard.

  26. bored says:

    So young and so talented. Makes me sad.

  27. Notashockatall says:

    I am at a loss for words, because I cannot believe so many people are shocked by her death. Tragic? Definitely. Shock? Nope, not even close. An enormous talent wasted by her own hands because she could not get her sh** together? Check that box off.

    I feel bad for her family, because they could not get her the help she desperately needed.

  28. Dani says:

    It is a very tragic story. I hope her family finds some peace. It must just be gut wrenching for them. Truth is though, you can only do so much for a person hell bent on drug use. I really don’t think it is fair that people are pointing fingers after the fact. It is enough people who loved her have to live with her being gone. Many people tried to help her. I don’t think they should also be tortured thinking they have some responsibility for her death. That lies with her disease of addiction.

  29. Me says:

    I dont have sympathy for people who kill themselves. It is a horrid shame though.

  30. Amanda says:

    Jesus. Everyone’s so eager to be first to report what killed Amy ya’ll can’t wait until the autopsy report’s back?

  31. Ell says:

    The media need to stop speculating on how she died until it’s officially announced.

    I don’t know why anyone would be suprised at Russell’s writing, beneath the crude humour is a sweet, sensitive man.

  32. Eleonor says:

    I’m really appreciating Reg, he did try to get her sober, and he failed, he must be hurt much more than we can imagine, and he hasn’t yet reliesed a statement. I’m really appreciating his attitude.

  33. JuJuBee says:

    I’ll miss Amy’s tremendous talent. I can’t bring myself to play any of her music right now. Just so sad.

  34. endoplasmic_ridiculum says:

    Seriously. Reg seems to be a class act.

    he din’t rush to Twitter, email, etc etc.

    His face says it all.

  35. REALIST says:

    Not unexpected, but still so sad. As per above, I will pay “Back to Black” forever. “Love is a Losing Game” is my favorite song; oddly enough, she sounded like the legendary Shirley Bassey with her inflections. Almost everyone who heard that album (Grammy folks included) saw her great potential.
    I thought she might turn around when she was producing and promoting her niece’s album; she loved her niece and her neice removed Amy from her own troubles, at least for awhile. But she didn’t make it….I cried when I heard about it Saturday night-pretty overwhelming along with the Norway killings.
    Another great talent squandered on drugs and alcohol. I loved her, and I loved Elliott Smith. His heroin addiction drove him to suicide.
    I do think it is the luck of the draw as to who gets the right support and treatment, and who doesn’t. Maybe she could have benefited from more moral support (vs back and forth to rehab, which is demoralizing) and from methadone treatment, but it’s too late now.
    So sad she died alone…so sad in general.
    And I won’t concede her cause of death until the toxicology report comes back either, although I confess my guess is an accidental overdose of heroin.

  36. aenflex says:

    May she come back as someone even stronger.

  37. phlyfiremama says:

    Of all of the potential drugs listed for causing her OD (Lets be real, it wasn’t natural causes)~the 2 with the potential to kill were the cocaine & heroin. Heroin suppresses/shuts down the respiratory system which is actually what causes the death, and cocaine jacks the heart horribly. The heart needs a certain set rhythm to maintain function, and cocaine disrupts the rhythm & basically shocks the heart-repeatedly. Ketamine (Special K) is a disassociative anesthetic commonly used in veterinary medicine. MDA/Ecstacy doesn’t kill people,unless its mixed with chemicals such as methamphetamine when it becomes MDMA AND is taken in very large doses. This website can help clear up much misinformation, and is a valuable educational tooL:
    http://www.erowid.org/

  38. jover says:

    Sad, and this story appears on the same page as yet another famewhoring appearance by that autotuned talentless moron KP. No wonder so many people despise the music industry and much of pop culture in general.

  39. 4Real says:

    Thank you for posting what are probably the only decent photos of her. She was a true artist and will be deeply missed.

    Ps – I’m buggin off the phrase “well known” dealer…why aren’t they in jail if its so “well known”?

  40. Eleonor says:

    @endoplasmic_ridiculum: yes Class is the word I was looking for, and I agree with Micheal K. on the DListed, when he says it’s only a matter of time for a tell all book written by that insect of Blake, who’s the one who’s responsible for some of Amy’s addiction, according to her father.

  41. TG says:

    I am glad Blake is in prison where he belongs. For him it was fun and games but for her it was life and death. And why do Kim Kardashian and Demi Moore put out tweets everytime a celebrity dies? And I can’t stand people coming on this site to criticize about what is newsworthy. There are many very important things going on around the world that are beyond tragic to even think about (child abuse, animal abuse, genocide, etc.) but it is sites such as celebitchy that helps put a balance in our lives otherwise we would all be f**ing depressed if all we ever focused on is “real news”. I just watched stuff on the holocaust last night and am still depressed this morning from it and that happened over 70 years ago.

  42. Aries_Mira says:

    What Russell wrote was beautiful. It was real, it was thought-provoking and touching. I have never, ever like Amy, but I do hope that she is now at peace.

  43. connie says:

    agree with poster #41, I was watching E News as they were talking about this unfortunate tragedy & all i could think was “and i care about what kim k thinks, why?” truely sad

  44. DethHammer says:

    You know, the entertainment industry really needs to shape up and change its extremely skewed views on drug abuse; if it did, perhaps deaths like Amy’s could be prevented.

    Charlie Sheen is lovingly viewed as a demi god with this drug-fueld hyperboles and Gaga said last year: “A little MDMA never killed anybody” and promotes her boyfriend/FWB Luc Carl’s “Drunk Diet”, which consists of consuming exhorbitant amounts of alcohol. And of course, there’s Lindsay. They and MANY others continue to promote the whole “drugs & excessive booze = glamorous and fun” lie (and perhaps throw out a flimsy “do as I say, not as a do” PR statement) and it needs to stop.

  45. The comparisons between other, “more worthwhile” tragedies is really getting trite, guys. This is a celebrity website where we talk about celebrity gossip. Right now, we are mourning the death of a woman who’s music impacted us in one way or another, not trying to wrap our heads around a sociopath. Get off your high horse and take your social commentary to a more appropriate forum.

    A time and a place for everything, people.

  46. UKHels says:

    I care about both stories in completely different ways – it doesn’t have to be mutually exclusive

    I loved Amy’s voice and her talent but her life was never going to end well – you’ve got to be banging the pipe pretty hard to get emphysema in your early 20s

    just a shame that she was surrounded with low life hangers on who fuelled her addiction, isn’t it always the way

  47. Kelly says:

    @abby, @ladybert – hard to believe that this genuinely talented artist is dead and LOHAN is still alive! Where is the justice in that? Just proves my theory that Lohan and Paris Hilton are the cockroaches of the entertainment industry – absolutely impervious.

  48. Máiread says:

    I would agree with Missy Aggrivation, UKHels et al. If you want to sniff and feel worthy about “caring more about a real news story” then off you go. Nobody is stopping you.

    But how do you decide which is more worthy? The disgusting murder of innocents on a Norweigan island, or the same number of people who are dying each day in East Africa from starvation and related diseases? It’s a slippery slope.

    Empathising with one death doesn’t preclude you from sympathising with the political murders of others.

  49. Máiread says:

    On topic. The inquest has been opened but adjourned pending full results. I have also read newspaper reports that Amy’s doctor saw her at about 10pm the night before and didn’t have undue concerns for her then.

    And her Blaaaaaaaake can fuck right off, as far as I’m concerned.

  50. grabbyhands says:

    @Hakura-it was the same for me. I was never a big fan, but hearing about her death actually brought tears to my eyes. So young to have carried the burden of her demons. And so much promise snuffed out. I hope that she is at peace now.

  51. Lisa says:

    I was just reading a post on peopleenespanol.com (The Spanish version of People) and a police officer stated that no drugs were found in her apartment and that she had been dead for approximately 6 hours before being found which was about 4 pm. This means she died around 10 am which is around the same time she told the security guard she wanted to sleep. I have a strong suspicion she went into cardiac arrest brought on by years of heavy drinking and drug use. But we’ll just have to wait for the toxicology reports. May God rest her soul.

  52. REALIST says:

    Amy is gone, and we mourn her.
    This thread merits addressing cracks in the system that only worsen the cycle of abuse.
    Thank you phlyfiremama. Your post was informative, and I believe education-based on science, not on system of punitive personal beliefs, is a very important part of the picture in terms of getting addicts out of the criminal justice system and out
    of their own cycle of destruction. Another variable that often gets ignored in rehab treatment and sentencing is mental illness, which is often the underlying cause of many addictions. Mental illness should not be criminalized.

    The criminal justice system in the US seems even less tolerant of addiction than in the UK.
    Both here and abroad, education about the science of addiction, rehabilitation, and the drugs involved may curb the punitive stance against drug abuse, and get addicts real help.
    The main individuals who need education are legislators and judges handling drug cases. These judges often have a great deal of discretion in dealing with drug cases (see the saga of Lindsey Lohan).
    “This American Life” aired a very shocking episode of a judge in GA abusing the drug court track in the criminal systems (which is supposed to decriminalize drug use, at least initially).
    “Tough Love”:
    http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/430/very-tough-love
    A definite crack in our system, because it turns out that many drug court judges have little supervision and a great deal of discretion in handling cases as well.

  53. Amanda G says:

    Aaaaand…let the conspiracy theories begin now!

    Why do people keep bringing up Norway? This is a gossip site, not a world news site. That’s why we are talking about Amy. Is it really that hard to comprehend?

  54. There are no winners in the life of drug addiction.Some are able to overcome their addictions with empowerment and help others who are still digging their own graves.Sadly,some don’t ever make it back.Addiction is not biased.Wealth,fame,creed,or race,will not buy one a free pass.Addiction claims,friends,siblings,fathers.It even claims mothers who cannot choose her children over the drugs.And when that happens it is the people who loved the addicts who are hurt the most.Drugs not only destroy most addicts,they leave scars for a lifetime to those who love them.

  55. REALIST says:

    Amy is gone, and we mourn her.
    This thread merits addressing cracks in the system that only worsen the cycle of abuse.
    Thank you phlyfiremama. Your post was informative, and I believe education-based on science, not on personal belief, is a very important part of the picture in terms of getting addicts out of the criminal justice system and out
    of their own cycle of destruction. Another variable that often gets ignored in rehab treatment and sentencing is mental illness, which is often the underlying cause of many addictions. Mental illness should not be criminalized.

    The criminal justice system in the US is seems even less tolerant of addiction than in the UK.
    Both here and abroad, education about the science of addiction, rehabilitation, and the drugs involved may curb the punitive stance against drug abuse, and get addicts real help.
    The main individuals who need education are legislators and judges handling drug cases. These judges often have a great deal of discretion in dealing with drug cases (see the saga of Lindsey Lohan).
    “This American Life” aired a very shocking episode of a judge in GA abusing the drug court track in the criminal systems (which is supposed to decriminalize drug use, at least initially).
    “Tough Love”:
    http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/430/very-tough-love
    A definite crack in our system, because it turns out that many drug court judges have little supervision and a great deal of discretion in handling cases as well.

  56. Mary says:

    one of my closest friends died of the after effects of a drug overdose. Alone. In bed. A very sad pattern.

  57. Gossip Owl says:

    @guiltypleasure
    I think we will have to agree to disagree on this one.
    I have major issues with the 12 steps program. I believe that addiction needs to be looked at as a psychological illness that can be treated. It especially seems so when so many have a concurring mental illness along with their addiction. Look at Amy, she had bipolar disorder.
    My problem with 12 steps is especially with the AA/NA model. It sets people up for failure and does not discriminate high risk relapses from low risk relapses (for example someone who is there because a court orders them to attend meetings may risk the recovery of someone who truly desires to stay clean but is drawn to negative influences). It also does not acknowledge that occasional relapses MAY be part of the recovery process. By occasional I don’t mean like a “Lindsay Lohan relapse” but one where a person learns from the experience and learns what may have triggered them to use in that occasion and learns how to cope with said trigger.
    I’m not saying that 12 steps should not be an OPTION for recovery but many programs make it mandatory for recovery when it may not work for everyone. In Amy’s case it sounds like no program would have really worked for her but she may or may not have had an opportunity to explore other options outside of a 12 step program. I just believe it needs to be acknowledged that 12 steps will not work for everyone. I do believe people can become clean in an alternative program (like SMART Recovery) or if a person truly hits rock bottom hard some may need no program at all and the experiences will drive them never to use again. I do believe that the 12 steps model is extremely dated and needs to be at the very least revised to acknowledge new facts we have about addiction and what works for people. You can’t use a model created in the 1950s and expect it to still be as effective in 2011 in treating addiction but many people IMO like yourself will not acknowledge that. It’s understandable if it works for YOU but we need to find a program that reaches more addicts than 12 steps does. Many people want to be clean but the 12 steps program does not always have the tools an individual needs to use it. It has many cracks that needs to be addressed and I personally think ongoing treatment is a hazard. Like cancer, if a person has been clean for 5 years I think it is safe to say they are cured. Part of me writes from experience, 12 steps didn’t work for me, but a program that also dealt with psychology, mental health and scientific behavior models did. But I know it’s different for everyone, we just need them programs to address individual needs, not assume everyone has the EXACT same problem.

  58. Whiny Dancer says:

    I seem to recall that some years ago Amy ended up in hospital after a suspected overdose of the same drug cocktail as reported above (cocaine, heroin, ecstasy, ketamine, alcohol). Does anyone else remember this or am I just imagining things?

  59. Mtn Girl says:

    @59-whinydancer – I think it was in 2007 Amy had her stomach pumped and in 2008 was quoted as saying she thought she would die young. I agree with @8-ghostwriter and @9-lizzy about Russell Brand’s statement and Amy’s family having to live with the realization that a terrible phone call would come, sooner rather that later. I also agree with many of the thoughtful comments on this thread – obviously addicts hurt WAY more than just themselves, and as @gossip owl said we really need to update the methods and laws in use for dealing with addiction (and substances in general, imo).

    I’ve had more than a few friends die from mental illness, alcohol, drugs and/or suicide and oftentimes it seems the addict really does feel worthless, despite pleas by loved ones to the contrary, and by taking themselves out of the picture they feel they are actually doing their loved ones a favor. A terrifying, vicious cycle, and I’m sure Amy’s family is beside themselves with grief because it seems they did as much as they could to try to help her get clean. Sometimes fragile, and willful flowers cannot be helped. They are the detailed, showy ones that bloom for only a brief season – that’s how I’d like to remember Amy Winehouse – her musicianship and raw talent will be missed. Sincere condolences to her loved ones.

  60. Hakura says:

    @Connie – “…“and i care about what kim k thinks, why?”.
    —-Because a simple, respectful, informative story about her passing just isn’t ‘interesting’ enough for E!. They have to cut & paste the Twitter posts of (so-called) ‘relevant‘ celebrities, because no one cares what her ‘normal‘ fans/friends think. (K.Osbourne & a few others are an exception, as they *were* her real friends).
    ——
    @MissyAggravation -
    —–ITA! I couldn’t believe how nasty some people are being, talking about how she deserves what she got, that no one should really care because she knowingly ruined her own life & practically ‘committed suicide‘. The woman just lost her life, & at just 27. Her family & friends just lost someone they loved.

    If anyone here wants to speak ill of the dead, & verbally ‘flip off’ all of those who actually care that she’s gone (including her personal friends & family), they need to find somewhere else to be callous & complain.
    ——
    @GrabbyHands- “it was the same for me. I was never a big fan, but hearing about her death actually brought tears to my eyes.”
    —– It’s good to hear that I’m not alone in that. It was totally unexpected to react that strongly. I mean, absolutely no one is surprised that it got to this point. But I guess it’s just the fact that she was still *here*, even if she was using. There was *hope*, even if it was against the odds. As I know most of us have said already, I also hope that at least her passing was gentle, in her sleep, since her life became so harsh & difficult.
    —–
    @Mary“one of my closest friends died of the after effects of a drug overdose. Alone. In bed. A very sad pattern.”
    —– I’m *so* sorry about your friend. =( I can’t even imagine how I would feel & react if 1 of my friends (let alone my *best* friend) were to do that. The horrid thing about addiction being that addicts hurt the people who care about them both while alive, & when they’re gone as a result of the addiction. =<
    —–
    (I apologize for the super long post, I was trying to catch up to everything I missed!)

  61. TXCinderella says:

    Rest in Peace Amy. Now you are out of pain and the torment that haunted you in this life. Lindsey Lohan will be next if she doesn’t take heed. She doesn’t take her recovery serious enough.

  62. Debbie says:

    Simple really if she wasn’t a druggie and loved the booze she would still be around, no one to blame but herself.