Meghan Markle is breaking down Big Fruitcake’s stranglehold on wedding cakes

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle attend an event at Millennium Point to celebrate International Women's Day in Birmingham

I’m generally more of a chocolate and/or cookies person, but sometimes my sweet tooth takes me to CAKE. There are just some days when I’m hankering for a simple white-cake cupcake, or a really small sheetcake (damn, I need to pick up a cake later today). Again, I don’t really have fancy tastes – I’m going to enjoy a really expensive cake as much as I will enjoy a cheap grocery store cake. But it’s not my wedding and I’m not invited to Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s wedding. It turns out, Harry and Meg aren’t doing the British-traditional fruitcake at their wedding. They’re going to do a lemon elderflower cake instead.

Meghan Markle is already breaking down the Establishment! THE FRUITCAKE ESTABLISHMENT. Big Fruitcake is going to get their knickers in a twist about that one. How dare this daft Yank come across the pond and deny the Fruitcake?!? Also: William and Kate had a traditional fruitcake for their wedding cake, but William also had a groom’s cake which was chocolate-biscuit. I wonder what Harry’s groom’s cake will be? And does anyone in Great Britain just do a simple white-cake, white-icing cake at weddings or is it always fruitcake? I’m telling you, The UK Fruitcake Industrial Complex is not going to be happy.

Prince Harry and fiancee Meghan Markle during a visit to Cardiff Castle as part of their royal duties

Prince Harry and fiancee Meghan Markle during a visit to Cardiff Castle as part of their royal duties

Photos courtesy of Pacific Coast News and WENN.

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192 Responses to “Meghan Markle is breaking down Big Fruitcake’s stranglehold on wedding cakes”

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  1. LAK says:

    I guess no wedding cake at christening of their first child!! *revenge of no fruitcake at wedding*

  2. Hazel says:

    Now that’s a modernization I can get behind.🍰

    • Olenna says:

      Agree. Fruitcake and mincemeat were the bane of my childhood, and all because of tradition. I still don’t believe my elders really liked that stuff.

      • LAK says:

        My love for fruitcake and mincepies knows no bounds.

        I actually forced myself to learn how to bake when i lived in the US and was faced with prospect of never eating fruitcake, mincepies or christmas pudding for a few years!!!

      • notasugarhere says:

        LAK there are a few monasteries who make them around Christmas. The monks in Big Sur make good ones IMO.

      • LAK says:

        Nota: Thanks for letting me know. It’s going into my electronic diary permanently just in case i ever find myself in the USA come christmas time.

      • Lilly says:

        YES! Blech to both. My grandma got mad once when she looked in the freezer in the summer and there was the fruitcake made for Christmas.

      • Shotcaller says:

        No one does fruitcake like West Indians. They puree the rum-soaked fruit and mix it in with the batter and use a mixture of brown and white sugars along with the world’s purest Dominican vanilla. Heaven!

      • magnoliarose says:

        I hate traditional fruitcake with that nasty hard jewel dried whatever in it.
        I usually dislike all fruitcake except the one shotcaller is talking about. I think I would love it.
        I eat Louisiana bread pudding with brandy sauce, and I love it, and the other thing my Mamere makes is rum cake. I can’t find a way to make it vegan yet, but I haven’t stopped trying. I believe it might be similar to shotcaller’s cake.

      • Olenna says:

        You guys, I’m glad you found good recipes and places to get decent fruitcakes. We had/have excellent cooks in my family and childhood church community, but not one of them could produce a cake, bread or pie with dried fruit that I could appreciate. Believe me, I tried (dousing them with rum or whiskey didn’t help either). I remember there was a sour dough starter being passed around for a bread recipe that included dried fruit. I thought it might be an option for a holiday dessert. But, nope, I didn’t like it nor do I like panettone, another one I gave a chance. I can eat dried fruit on it’s own or in trail mix all day, but please do not put it in batter. And, mincemeat? Well, I’ve said enough, LOL!

      • Shotcaller says:

        magnoliarose
        If you don’t mind substituting Duncan Hines makes a vegan cake mix. With egg substitute and Earth Balance butter you should be able to follow a standard rum cake recipe to perfection. Also try using pineapple rum to give it a textured, smooth kick.

      • bluhare says:

        There is nothing like an English fruit cake. American ones are terrible.

        I also did not think I liked mince pies until last Christmas. But I do! And I’ve always loved Christmas pudding with white sauce.

        My mom makes a great tea loaf. Not quite a fruit cake, but not quite not either. :)

      • magnoliarose says:

        @Olenna
        I hear you believe me. I love dried fruit, but I need convincing if it is baked in something.

        @shotcaller
        I can’t live without Earth Balance and egg replacer. I didn’t know about DH mix. Thanks!

        I see bluhare refuses to be deterred about the fruitcake. lol

    • minx says:

      I’m dying at “Big Fruitcake.”

    • Frida says:

      The comments on the DM story are HILARIOUS. “Abolish the monarchy! No respect!” lol

  3. Wellsie says:

    What is a groom’s cake?

    • Argonaut says:

      i’ve only seen the worst of them here in the US – sports themed, fishing themed, video game themed, etc. more like a child’s birthday cake than a wedding cake. because weddings are only for women, right?? eyeroll

    • Lightpurple says:

      I swear my colleague spent more time worrying over his groom’s cake than the entire rest of the marriage and wedding. Many non-US cultures have a smaller Groom’s cake at the wedding. My colleague finally went with a coconut spiced rum cake that was delicious

      • M4lificent says:

        At weddings that have a groom’s cake — I always go for that. They usually taste way better than the actual wedding cake. But lemon elderflower sounds wonderful!

        For my sister’s wedding (No. 2, as I recall), they didn’t even mess around with sicky-sweet white chocolate frosting to keep the wedding cake white. They just did straight-up dark chocolate frosting decorated with violets and lighter-colored chocolate leaves. It was lovely and super-tasty.

    • Merritt says:

      I’ve never seen one in person. The only one I’ve seen is the armadillo shaped on in the movie Steel Magnolias.

    • Becks says:

      A bleedin’ armadillo grooms cake! It’s got gray icing!

    • magnoliarose says:

      A smaller cake the groom chooses that is a different flavor from the wedding cake. Usually, people have it as a choice for people who might not like the wedding cake.
      My husband’s cake was unusual, but we didn’t put garish decorations on it. It was more of a statement with meaning.

    • Becks says:

      Oh and I think traditionally they’re bc the wedding cake was the “brides cake” and then the grooms cake was usually something less sweet- like a spice cake or something. When I got married (2007) “grooms cakes” were served at the rehearsal.

    • DM2 says:

      Canadian here with familial and geographical UK traditions (esp. foodstuffs) — we had a groom’s cake (fruitcake) for the groom’s supper, and then a tiered wedding cake with the top tier being another, smaller fruitcake. This wasn’t eaten, but saved for either the 1st-year wedding anniversary, or the first-born’s christening — whichever came first :) In my case, it was brought out again (from the freezer) for the 1st-year anniversary party. I hate fruitcake.

      • CEM says:

        Fellow Canadian here and growing up, every wedding I went to had a groom’s cake (fruitcake) that had been cut into small, long pieces which were wrapped in saran wrap and then a paper doily and tied with ribbon. It was given out to the single women and girls to put under their pillows and dream of their future husband. Most guests took a piece though – even if they weren’t single or female. I felt robbed the first time I went to a wedding that didn’t have it and was told it was a Canadian thing.

    • Nicole says:

      Here in the US its usually a smaller cake that is decorated to the husband’s preference or a theme special to the couple. My best friend’s grooms cake was the logo of the college we all attended. The regular wedding cake and groom’s cake were two different flavors for options

  4. Argonaut says:

    buttercream is everything. good for them.

  5. Jussie says:

    I haven’t been to a wedding in the UK in the last 30 years where fruitcake was served as the main wedding cake. I’ve been to a couple where one of the grandmothers made one and the couple served that alongside their choice, but I can’t imagine a young (or hell, middle-aged) couple choosing fruitcake as the main option these days. Rationing is over and refrigerators exist!

  6. Cynical Ann says:

    And the baker is another transplanted Californian!

  7. Apple Hat says:

    ELDERFLOWER AND LEMON ugh it’s impossible to do anything in this country without elderflower and lemon now! Dull!

    Mostly joking, I mean who cares really. Can’t believe the world is so starved for news that this gets its own post.

  8. manda says:

    we had an almond flavored cake and it was divine!!

  9. Mrs. WelenMelon says:

    I want to see this elderflower cake as a compromise. Harry was all TeamFruitcake and Meghan TeamRedVelvetCake. They met in the middle.

  10. Rhys says:

    They’ll just have an extra tier of fruitcake or one on the side. It is a tradition and there’s no reason they can’t and won’t make sure it’s there.

    Can anyone remind me why Meghan, supposedly a kind and intelligent person is marrying this guy, described as a dim and dumb in the previous thread? I think there’s more to Meghan than people like to think and she is not quite what she tries to pretend to be.

    • Apple Hat says:

      Eh, I see a lot of people calling her an opportunistic climber who’s been, like, planning this her whole life somehow. Alongside a lot of people calling her an amazing Genius/Saint. Obviously neither seem true to most of us.

      I honestly think she likes him, and I bet she also likes the thought of marrying a Prince – it’s not without its perks, right?
      If she didn’t want to be famous, I don’t think she’d have become a TV actress. But I also don’t know if she’s prepared for the 24/7 scrutiny.

      Long story short, neither of them is a genius, being a royal (but not a monarch) is a pretty sweet deal and why not enjoy it, and they do seem to have actual chemistry.

      • @Rhys I fail to see the correlation between your characterization of his intelligence and her ability to be kind.
        “dim and dumb” is very subjective. If you judge a fish by it’s ability to fly, randoms on celebitchy will claim your fish is dim and dumb.
        Plus we are all geniuses here.

      • Shotcaller says:

        Dim or not Harry successfully learned to fly and operate a military chopper. They don’t let you do that because you’re a prince. Harry studied for months and aced the test. Most people excel at what matters to them and that requires intelligence.harry had never been given a goal he cared enough about imo.

    • Lala says:

      Over the years…Harry has evolved as he’s gotten older…that’s seen in his charity work…and the way he presents himself…And regarding Meghan…she has info in the public atmosphere since she was a little girl…and it’s all been consistent…she’s thoughtful and intelligent as hell, you don’t have her educational background WITHOUT having the chops to back it up…as she never had the money/social status to fake the funk…I thought Harry would end up being a broke-down version of his brother also…however the last five years have shown me otherwise…as my my girl Kelli from “Insecure”…so pointedly stated last season…”That’s what’s called growth!”

    • Cate says:

      I can kind of see it not mattering that he isn’t super bright, as long as he’s loving and considerate of her and has a few interests that she shares or respects. He’s loaded, for starters, so no worrying about him not being smart/driven enough to earn enough $$ or spend his income wisely (think about how many couples fight about or ultimately break up due to money stress). He has at this point clearly developed a few signature interests that he puts a consistent effort into (e.g. Invictus Games), so he does presumably have something he’s interested in to talk about–people are often infinitely smarter and more interesting when the topic is something they care about.

    • Scram says:

      I don’t know the Obamas seem to like him too. And whether you’re into that family or not, they’re not cruel and they’re certainly not dumb. Maybe that person mostly saw one side of him, maybe he grew up, or maybe it’s just charm. Or we can go with ulterior motives because that’s more fun.

      • Argonaut says:

        harry’s long in charm and emotional intelligence and less in traditional booksmarts which imo gets you further in life anyway esp in a job like harry’s. i’ve got low emotional intelligence but great booksmarts so school was easy, but ever since i’ve felt that life would be easier with more EQ than IQ since doing well with people seems more crucial to a happy adult life than just being smart

    • notasugarhere says:

      The BRF has often been described as short in IQ, but many of them have high EQs. That why Sophie is such a good addition, because she brought more IQ smarts to the family along with her own EQ.

      Compared to other European monarchies, the BRF are poorly educated academically. Not their strong suit.

    • Sage says:

      I think they love each other. It s the comments that he could do better or she’s not good enough for him. Fine, that’s their opinion but I’m curious why?

    • magnoliarose says:

      I think a lot of people are stupid when they are young and do dumb stuff that isn’t caught on camera and are lucky in that way. People bring up old stories about Harry but nothing about the present. People grow, and he’s been to therapy so I would believe it helped. I just don’t see an arrested 19 year old anymore.
      I never labored under the idea the BRF were brain trusts, so I shrug at that.

      Who knows what she sees. The assumption that is all about money and status can be said of anyone who attaches themselves to them. They look like they get along and really enjoy being together. I don’t think the Obamas would like him so much if he was a waste of space.

    • minx says:

      Well, I do think he’s head over heels for her….he’s like the hearts-for-eyes emoji when he looks at her.

    • Princessk says:

      I am so tired of this dim Harry nonsense. As I have said before most of this ‘dim Harry’ talk started because of his, so we are told, poor results at school. Harry’s teenage years at Eton coincided with an incredible amount tabloid gossip about whether his mother was murdered, whether she was unhinged, her messy love life etc etc.

      So many new stories came out of the woodwork, now it seems we have heard almost everything. But teenage years are hard enough and I can understand how awful it must have been for Harry’s concentration on school work. There really is no other evidence apart from his record at Eton suggest that Harry is less intelligent than the average person.

  11. Michelle says:

    Sounds delicious 😋 but lemon is also a fruit. So is it still a fruitcake or not?

    Our weddingcake was with different flavor Chocolate, tiramisu and strawberries. It was so good. But we had many desserts too :-)
    Pancakes, mousse au chocolate etc.

  12. Clare says:

    We had three tiers – chocolate, lemon and poppyseed, and coffee at our British wedding. Haven’t actually had a fruitcake at a wedding in ages! I think what a lot of people do is have the top tier be fruitcake to save for later, or a separate fruitcake that isn’t the ‘main’ cake?

    Also I don’t think Brit’s do ‘grooms’ cakes? At least I’ve never noticed one.

  13. Erinn says:

    I don’t like floraly food. I have way too strong a sense of smell – which is only amplified when I have migraines – and most florals and I just don’t get along. I’ve never got the trend of essentially eating flowers. EG: Lavender lemonade, lavender infused cupcakes – things like that.

    And I’m not saying it isn’t lovely to some people. It’s just not something palatable to me. Usually these kinds of drinks/foods are VERY pretty though.

  14. Lila says:

    FINALLY, someone had the nerve to say “No” to the fruit cake! LOL!

  15. Maria says:

    Good! I hate fruitcake! Not that I’m invited! 😩

    • FLORC says:

      There’s fruitcake and there’s fruitcake. It can be absolutely delicious, but more often it’s really bad.

      • Cee says:

        We have fruitcake for Christmas Eve and NYE in Argentina and I always want to set it on fire. Now I just bake a chocolate cake for myself and the kids.

      • Cate says:

        Yes, it can be quite good if it’s done right. I used to dislike the fruitcake my parents served at Christmas but have since grown to really look forward to it–because I found a better recipe! I’ve also found the secret to getting it right is to be very liberal with the booze (also, don’t stint on the fat!). I soak all the dried fruit in brandy before mixing the cake, and then also “feed” it every week or so while it matures. And it absolutely needs to mature for a minimum of a month, but longer is good too. Less maturing time means you are just getting a bunch of pasted together fruit. The longer it matures the more everything melds and you get a lovely rich and moist cake.

        I think it’s also worth seeking out good quality dried fruit. Nice plump raisins, sultanas, apricots, etc. You don’t want them all shriveled and overly dried up!

        Finally, I believe there is a difference between fruitcake in the US and UK. American fruitcake seems to be much heavier on the brightly colored red/green fruit peel, the dough is a bit lighter in color, and there is often pineapple involved. IMO that variety of fruitcake is pretty vile.

      • LAK says:

        In defence of fruitcake…..what Cate said😊

      • Catherinethegoodenough says:

        I never liked the Trappist fruitcake we had at Christmas, but my friend’s family made something called “Bishop’s Bread” that was amazing! It had the same brandied fruit but a lighter candy part, and — wait for it — chocolate chips! Oh so good.

      • Trying Again says:

        YES! There is fruitcake and there is fruitcake. lol

        I had only one time in my life an absolutely delicious fruitcake that I could not stop eating. And I grew up with relatives who ALWAYS made fruitcake. Most Americans do not know how to make it. This amazing cake was baked by a gentleman from the south….Louisiana? He was VERY liberal with the brandy.

        My wedding cake was chocolate. I did it for my husband. It was amazingly delicious and froze very well.

  16. Becks says:

    The cake sounds delicious. My guess is that there will still be fruitcake, it just wont be the main cake, or what they slice into for their first piece (do they do that in Britain? ceremonial first slice, feeding each other?)

  17. Birdix says:

    My family has a fruitcake that has been regifted (disguised) since 1995. The same fruitcake. I’m trying to think of the best way to get it to my uncle incognito for Christmas.

  18. Red says:

    I hate the taste of lemon, so this sounds just as bad as fruitcake.

  19. Maum says:

    No, they don’t feed each other in Britain.

    I think they might have fruitcake for cutting and keeping (traditional) and the gorgeous lemon cake for dinner.

  20. Lucy says:

    Sounds delicious. Have your cake and eat it too, Meg! ;)

  21. Eden75 says:

    My mom tried to get me to do the traditional fruitcake crap at my wedding. Fooled her, I eloped 8 months ahead of schedule! I like to tease her and tell her it was because of the cake.

  22. JustJen says:

    We had an Italian torte cake at our wedding 20 years ago. Whoa…have I really been married that long?? Dang, anyway people were a little surprised (or so I was told) that it wasn’t a regular cake, but I didn’t give a rat’s arse. That’s still my favorite cake.

  23. Ebi says:

    Croquembouche! I’ve had that at weddings and it’s spectacular. Lemon and elderflower sounds delicious and it will be gorgeous covered in fresh flowers.

  24. wowsers says:

    Sounds delicious. Is anyone else amazed that KP would officially release this “news”?

  25. paranormalgirl says:

    Lemon and Elderflower sounds DELICIOUS! It’s like this drink I’ve had with elderflower liquor, vodka, and lemon.

  26. harla says:

    Can anyone tell me if British fruitcake is the same as American fruitcake? Also, does anyone know why it seems to be a British wedding cake staple?

  27. OriginalLala says:

    I follow the official Kensington Royal insta (I know, I know..why!!!??) and the comments under this news were mean! people seem to want to hate on them for no reason… I mean, it’s cake ffs.

  28. NotSoSocialButterfly says:

    The mister and I tasted samples and chose our tasty cake ourselves. We had no groom’s cake.
    We made all decisions together- except for my flowers and my tiny bridal attendance party’s flowers, and he chose his boutonniere & those of his groomsmen.

  29. Cee says:

    I loathe fruitcake. Not that it matters one bit lol

  30. Jane says:

    Lemon and elderflower cake with butter cream sounds delicious, and I may or may not be drooling.

    It does irk me, however, that Kensington Palace is advertising a bakery (three tweets about the cake identifying the bakery!), even if it is going to make the wedding cake. Surely they are paying? So they shouldn’t have to advertise too?

  31. Lana 234 says:

    The lemon elderflower sounds delicious

  32. Other Renee says:

    I’ve never heard of a groom’s cake. Their cake sounds lovely except for the fresh flowers but to each. We had three tiers: carrot, chocolate and I forget. Probably vanilla. It wasn’t a huge cake but I loved the tiers. I wanted us to look like the little bride and groom on top of the wedding cake and we did. Standing next to it made for cute pics.

  33. Kittylouise says:

    Some crazy commentary on the Daily Mail website, good grief. And the fact the royal wedding cake is being made in EAST LONDON.

    I’m a Brit and although fruit cake is still pretty common, in my experience most weddings have a differently flavoured cake (just a normal sponge, or chocolate cake), or they have one tier of fruit cake and the rest a sponge. It’s pretty unusual I would say to have JUST fruit cake. I have never seen a groom’s cake at a wedding, that would be really unusual I would say.

  34. whatever says:

    Cake announcement today to cover up the news of their random trip to Greece just before the wedding? The cynic inside me thinks so (See DM).

    • Olenna says:

      I think there’s more to the article and the trip that you’re not sharing, unless you didn’t read it in it’s entirety.

      • magnoliarose says:

        I did because you mentioned it. It looks like they are going to meet up with Charles and Camilla maybe?
        Now I want some Greek food. Fasolakia, patates lemonates, horta and fakes soupa (green beans in tomato sauce, lemon potatoes, chicory greens and lentil soup). The only Greek I know is food, and since I am vegan, I don’t have a whole bunch to memorize. lol

        I am jealous of them. I would love to go to Greece right now and get away from the US 24-7 nightmare.

      • Olenna says:

        @magnoliarose, agree about the meet-up. The article says they will be there for a one-day stopover while the PoW is the area. The Greek dishes you mentioned sound wonderful. I spent a little time in the Saronic and Cyclades Islands a few years ago and found the simplest of dishes like grilled meats, sauteed greens, and fava were the best, and I developed a sweet tooth from eating loukoumades. If I could, I would go back in a heart beat. Loved the people, the scenery and the many bakeries and stray (but not neglected) cats.

      • whatever says:

        Still seems random/pointless to me. What is the point of tagging on to someone else foreign tour? and if it’s not a ‘work’ trip what’s the point of them going on holiday then when they will most likely go on honeymoon after the wedding anyway?

      • magnoliarose says:

        @Olenna
        I am dead at loukoumades. Love them. Greek is simple but so healthy and delicious. I found when I make it or have it out it really is one of those cuisines that need quality, in season vegetables to be able to get the full flavor. And tasty olive oil, not the bland stuff.

        @whatever
        Maybe because they want to see Phillip’s country. I love to travel, so I don’t hate on anyone else who wants to with their romantic partner. They have their own money they can do what they want with it.

    • notasugarhere says:

      If they are going? I doubt they’d go to place that just outed them.

      W&K went on both of the annual Middleton holidays the spring before their engagement, Mustique and skiing, no? That might have been the year they started sneaking out via Scotland and tried France for the first time. Outed by photographs on social media. The press started watching the Scottish airport after that, which led to the use of the loaner private plane for later trips.

  35. MellyMel says:

    I knew I liked this couple. I can’t stand fruitcake! My family makes it every Christmas and I get asked if I want to try it again every year and the answer is hell no! Anyways, lemon elderflower sounds really light and perfect for Spring. I’m curious what he’ll do for his groom’s cake. Here in the South, men get really creative with the designs.

  36. IndifferentCat says:

    So happy for Claire! Violet Cakes is such a lovely little company. I usually provide her with flowers for her cakes so I hope I can do the same for this one

  37. Hi There says:

    Personally I think the cake sounds really good . But I always wonder why is it that it seems “exciting” when the English Monarchy break with traditional and is considered so progressive but other cultures work so hard to preserve theirs and it is considered a good thing? For example here in Canada many Indo-Canadian weddings are very traditional -some brides even fly to India to get their dresses and that is an honored tradition it would seem kind of “rude” to the community to try to change these time honored traditions At a wedding would it not be the same for the British Community and their cultural traditions – why is it that other communities seem to want to keep traditions but want the British to throw theirs away. And do other cultures have a right to tell other cultures that they are outdated? For example does the English culture have the right to tell the Indian culture they are outdated or the other way around does the INDIAN culture have the right to tell the English culture that ? Thoughts?

    • Oya says:

      It feels like you are confusing things that are quite different. The English have a long history of colonization– demanding that other cultures get rid of their “savage” customs, languages and religions– from the Irish in the 15th century to the South Asians in the 19th/20th centuries. Nowadays people are rightfully leery of that kind of cultural imperialism.

      In contrast no one is forcing the BRF to get rid of British customs. As far as people care, they are celebrating a modern couple deciding that certain customs are just relics that don’t connect them or that guests that profoundly to a national history-and celebrating a couple making decisions together in a rational way rather than simply saying “its always been that way.”

      The custom you mention of going to India for a wedding sari/gown seems to be a freely chosen activity that literally connects the bride to a homeland.

  38. Ib says:

    Does anyone else think that Kensington Palace’s official tweets describing the cake read as hilarious/ridiculous

  39. Chef Grace says:

    Love seeing old traditions broken.
    My son and wife did cupcakes in the tiered style of a wedding cake. No grooms cake. Instead they had a huge platter of fully loaded nachos. And a taco bar. It was different and fun .

  40. wood dragon says:

    Ugh! FRUITCAKE. The bane of my childhood.

  41. HeyThere! says:

    Omg…wedding cake is amazing. Our wedding cake was expensive but the best cake I have ever had(along with every other cake from this specific bakery)!!!!! I would be sad if I went to a wedding and there was no cake. LOL Cupcakes are a perfect supplement of a traditional wedding cake in my book. Anything else is just not okay with it me. Ha!

  42. Lyla says:

    I’m not a fan of cake (other than cheesecake).

  43. Stini says:

    I’ve lived in the UK all my life, been to many, many weddings and never ever encountered a fruitcake. It’s not really a thing, is it? That’s a Christmas tradition.

  44. c says:

    sophie and edward had devils food cake so meghan is not breaking tradition

  45. Liberty says:

    Wonderful choice!! One I can vouch for: Mr L and I had an elderflower cake with lemon glaze at our wedding. It was fabulous for hot midsummer, and lightly decorated with edible flowers. There was a secondary chocolate mousse cake with raspberry sauce for those not into something lemony. Sort of a groom’s cake, I suppose as the men tore into it in addition to the main cake, but not an official groom’s cake. (This was a wedding planned on the fly, a beach wedding coinciding with a big group vacation. But by god, there was fab food, Champagne and cake cake cake.)

    We froze a piece for the one year (basically fine, with prosecco). We still have a little piece frozen in a little box, just because, ten years later.

  46. Claire Renee says:

    I’m from western Canada and for the longest time fruitcake was the go to wedding cake covered with white royal icing/frosting. My sister had that at her wedding in 1975. I also recall mom baking fruitcake that we cut into small rectangles, wrapped in Saran Wrap, then wrapped in tiny white paper doily and tied with ribbon matching sister’s colours. It was never referred to as groom’s cake though. I think grooms cake is a more modern thing imported from US. For my own wedding in 2002 I choose not to have any cake. I do like a good (homemade) fruitcake but generally not a cake person. There were lots of pies, cakes and cheesecake slices included for dessert in the buffet supper.

  47. Flaming Oh says:

    Ahhhh it’ll be sad when whiskey super-saturated adult fruitcake is consigned to history . But still torch any wedding traditions you see fit Meg.

  48. Mimi says:

    Oh gosh, I love lemon cake with icing sugar on the top.

    I dont know why but the freshness of lemon cake and icing sugar, its taste so gooood.
    Its time to change from chocolate cake to be about carrot or lemon cake…

    Great choose for summer cake

  49. PJ says:

    I am HERE for the elderflower/lemon cake! Two of my favorite flavors (well, fresh lemon juice and elderberries, anyway) 😋

    I wonder if the cake will have a nice, tart zing to it? Yum. That being said, I can totally see how such a flavor combo would be a little polarizing amongst guests…I wonder if they’ll offer up a more traditional option as well like vanilla and or chocolate? Whatever the case, I’ve never met a formal occasion cake that I didn’t like.

  50. Maum says:

    And Christmas. Although that comes without icing and is called pudding.
    They’re weird. :)

  51. JustJen says:

    Here in NE Ohio, fruitcake is a punishment so I was stunned to stumble upon a good one last Christmas. No, really I was SHOCKED. A local Italian bakery makes them, a small one goes for $15 and there’s no raisins. Seriously, who puts raisins in cake. So gross!! They’ll even ship them out and they’re in high demand. I won’t touch any other fruitcake, ever.

  52. Lady D says:

    I remember reading once that when New York cheesecake was first served, it came with raisins. Gag.

  53. Skylark says:

    ‘Seems’ being the operative word. Why do people continue to use the comments on the DM as a measure of how someone is viewed? Seriously?

    It is troll city and the comments are a refection of nothing other than that.

  54. notasugarhere says:

    A handful of trolls on the DM and tumblr, posting under multiple names, and egging each other on? Doesn’t represent all of the UK.

  55. Veronica says:

    Oh, here we go again with the tumblr accusations!! Some stories have 6000 comments, mostly negative from a glance at top comments. That’s a LOT of trolls with a LOT of fake names!!!
    Why can’t people understand there is a large percentage of people in England who are not happy with their favorite son marrying a divorced American actress. Pretending it isn’t there is just absurd. And yes, some of them may be racist, too, but not all. These are many of the same people who gave us Idiot Trump for fake President and in the US, we have to acknowledge they are out there, and there are quite a few.
    Point being, Meghan is not universally loved, or even being given a chance by a proportion of the citizens of her new country. And it isn’t going to get better. She had better have a thick skin.

  56. Olenna says:

    @Skylark and Nota,
    I agree. The Fail’s commenters are a vicious lot of trolls, fueled by racism and classicism (the latter I call the Upstairs, Downstairs crew for their uppity servant-type meanness). They don’t give a flip about Harry; they just hate Meghan. Even before she came of the scene, they were making disparaging, humiliating remarks about Harry’s parentage and his social behavior, and rarely gave him credit for his military service and support to veterans. Fortunately, these trolls are but a very small percentage (probably less than 1%) of Great Britain’s total population, and if you consider how many ugly Americans comment with hatred towards Meghan and the regulars who comment repeatedly under different names, the percentage is surely even less.

  57. CairinaCat says:

    Here we go again with”Veronica” getting so butthurt and over involved with British royalty and insisting on what the British people want… When she isn’t British herself.

  58. Princessk says:

    @Veronica…..DM comments is populated by Brexit loving trolls. There are tons of decent people who have completely stopped reading DM because it has sunk so low. I think DM is now on a par with the Sun and the Star, and even the National Enquirer, with headlines that bear no relationship to the actual stories.

    I continue to go on DM largely because it has good pics and is user friendly and I feel that its is important to make comments that counteract the lies and racism. I wish more decent people were able to hold their noses and go on DM and tell the truth because many unsuspecting people actually believe the comments , maybe you Veronica are one of them.

    Serena Williams use to get a lot of online abuse but ever since Rena’s Army gathered itself together the trolls now usually get drowned out. I am hoping that will happen for Meghan too but for now too few rational minded people comment on articles about her. There are just a few of us against a body of people who appear to me to have had sexual frustrations triggered which they are projecting on to Harry and Meghan’s relationship.

  59. magnoliarose says:

    I didn’t know that about Serena. I am glad because the abuse toward her was just horrible.
    Maybe I will peek from time to time. I couldn’t take DM and the onslaught of reality stars and beach frolickers doing nothing worth noting.
    I love your comments Princessk. They are fair and knowledgeable. So in your honor, I will try to look from time to time. :)

  60. Sam says:

    @veronica…. and how do you know a lot of them are British? Changing your nationality on a DM profile is very easy and a lots of the nasty comments actually come from non brits